Japanese Tank Designations of the Second World War

Japanese Tank Designations of the Second World War


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

Japanese Tank Designations of the Second World War

Most of the tanks used by the Imperial Japanese Army during the 1930s and 1940s were identified by two complementary designation systems.

The first was used to identify all Army equipment, and consisted of a type number based on the imperial year that the item was accepted. Before 1945 three systems of dating a year were in use in Japan – the Anno Domini system, the era name based on the regnal years of the current emperor, and the imperial year, counting from the then accepted foundation of Japan in 660 BC. In 1873 the Gregorian calendar was adopted, and the Japanese New Year was moved to 1 January. This rather neatly lined up the western and Imperial year systems, so that 1940 became 2600.

Up until 1940/2600 the accepted practise was to use the last two numbers of the year as a type number, as in the Type 89 medium tank of 1929, with Type 100 for items accepted in 1940. After 1940 only the last digit was used, so Type 2 equipment was accepted in 1942.

The second designation system saw each tank given a name, essential to separate between two tanks accepted in the same year. At first the names were simple – the Type 89 medium tank was the “I-Go”, or “first car/model” while the Type 95 light tank was the “Ha-Go”, or “third car/model” (no second model has been identified).

This system was then refined to give each tank a two letter name, with the first letter standing for the type of tank and the second for the order in which the tanks were developed.

The majority of tanks fell into three categories – Chi, Ke and Ho, or Medium, Light and Gun respectively, with Chi and Ke used as single character abbreviations for Chiu (or Chui) and Kei.

The numbering system used was based on the Iroha, a Japanese poem first mentioned in 1079. This used every character from the Japanese syllabary once, and for a long time was used to put those characters in order (in a rather poetic version of the ABC). The first two lines of the poem, transliterated in roman letters, ran:

i ro ha ni ho he to
chi ri nu ru wo

This gave the following number order

1- I or Yi
2 - Ro
3 - Ha
4 - Ni
5 - Ho
6 - He
7 - To
8 - Chi
9 - Ri
10 - Nu
11 - Ru
12 - O or Wo

Light Tanks

Medium Tanks

Chi-I

Medium First

Chi-Ro

Medium Second

Chi-Ha

Medium Third

Chi-Ni

Medium Fourth

never built

Chi-Ho

Medium Fifth

Type 98 (never built)

Chi-He

Medium Sixth

Chi-To

Medium Seventh

Chi-Ri

Medium Ninth

Chi-Nu

Medium Tenth

Gun Tanks

Ho-I

Gun First

Ho-Ro

Gun Second

Type 4 Ho-Ro

Ho-Ni

Gun Fourth

Ho-To

Gun Seventh

Type 95 with 120mm

Ho-Ri

Gun Ninth

Ho-Ru

Gun Eleventh

Type 5 Ho-Ru


Description

Japan spent a large part of the 1920’s obtaining examples of foreign armored vehicles and concepts. One such example is the A1E1 Independent, which the Japanese obtained plans for. This resulted in the Ishi-108. One of the few failures of tank design the Japanese picked up was the idea of multi-turreted tanks. This likely came from their interest in the British A1E1 Independent and the Soviet T-28 tanks.
Multi-turreted tanks are almost universally considered to be a bad idea because they add weight to the tank from items such as gearing and the structure required to mount a turret as well as making the vehicle much harder to command. On a single turret tank, this weight could be used for more armor or bigger guns and engines. Multiple turrets also comprise the armor integrity by having a series of holes in the armor to mount the turrets.

The Mitsu 104 from a 1944 British-issued recognition handbook on Japanese equipment.
This unfortunate trend in design existed in all the Japanese heavy tank projects, apart from the AI-96 from 1936.
One such multi-turreted design was the Mitsubishi 104, which is shortened in the documentation to “Mitsu-104”.
There seems to be no evidence the Mitsu-104 was ever built, unlike the Type 97 Heavy Tank. Design wise, it seems to have been a logical development of the Type 97, looking far more refined and capable, although the exact date of the tank’s design is unknown.
The Mitsu-104 had three slightly conical turrets. The main turret mounted a 75mm low velocity gun possibly based off one of the Japanese field artillery guns of the same calibre. Two sub-turrets were mounted on the front hull, each with a machine gun.

Original Japanese drawings of the Mitsu 104 found in the British National Archives.
There was some confusion about the armament for the tank. A pair of 37mm guns were listed, however, the British were confused as to their location. The Type 97 Heavy tank from 1937 had the option of two 37mm guns or a single 75mm guns mounted in the turret. This is likely because the Japanese considered the heavy tanks for the support of the infantry, and in the Japanese military 37mm guns were called ‘rapid fire infantry guns’. The British documents suggest the Mitsu-104 could have had 37mm guns in the sub-turrets, which certainly look big enough to mount such a weapon. This could, of course, be a translation mistake for the twin guns in the main turret.
The rest of the hull was conventional in its layout with the engine at the rear of the tank. Although the tank is rather wide for its size.
The suspension was the same style of Bell Crank suspension used on most Japanese tanks of the period and indeed lived on until the failed O-I Super Heavy Tank design.


The Mitsu-104 with 37mm main armament.


The Mitsu-104 with 75mm main armament.

Both illustrations are by William ‘Richtor’ Byrd, funded by DeadlyDilemma through our Patreon campaign


United States tank recognition chart showing the Mitsu 104 in the lower left corner.


List of Japanese government and military commanders of World War II

The following were closely involved in the government:

Vice Chairman of the Councilors of Court Edit

Prime Ministers Edit

    : Prime Minister, Commander-in-Chief of Kwantung Army, Minister of War, member of Imperial Privy Council amongst political adviser in Taisei Yokusankai : Prime Minister, also chief of secret services in the Black Dragon Society : Prime Minister in his second term organized the Tonarigumi organization, Nation Service Society official government syndicate, and Taisei Yokusankai (Imperial Rule Assistance Association) group amongst official expert of Jews affairs : General in Imperial Forces, Prime Minister, Home Affairs and Justice Minister, chief of Keishicho Police forces, Minister without Portfolio, founder and leader in Shintoist Rites Research Council amongst Last President of Imperial Privy Council : Imperial Army General, Prime Minister, member of Imperial Privy Council, political adviser in militarist Genro grouping and last Governor in Chosen :Imperial Navy Admiral, Prime Minister, Minister of Marine, Chief of War Relief Association, expert in Jews topics amongst Imperial and Supreme War Councillor : Prime Minister, Home Affairs Minister, Education Minister, Trade Minister, War Minister, Head of Kodoha Party also Commander-in-Chief of Japanese Imperial Forces in same period, also led the Keishicho (Tokyo Metropolitan Police Department) also was for some time head of the Munitions Ministry. : Prime Minister and head of Ministry of Greater East Asia (Japan), Vice-Minister of War, also commander of the Imperial Volunteer Corps defensive organization : Imperial Navy Admiral, Marine Minister, Military Councillor, Grand Chamberlain and Privy Councilor, later Prime Minister : Prime Minister, Staff Officer, Army General Staff Headquarters, Military Councilor, Chief of the Army Aeronautical Department, and Commander-in-Chief of the Home Defense Headquarters

Chief Cabinet Secretary Edit

Military Secretary to Prime Minister Edit

Lord Keeper of the Privy Seal Edit

    (30 March 1925 – 26 February 1935) (26 February 1935 – 26 February 1936) (6 March 1936 – 6 March 1936) (6 March 1936 – 1 June 1940) (1 June 1940 – 24 November 1945)

Imperial Privy Council Edit

President of Privy Council

    : Privy Councillor : Privy Councillor : Privy Councillor : Privy Councillor : Privy Councillor : Privy Councillor : Privy Councilor

Imperial State Council Edit

Imperial Aide to the Crown Prince Edit

Military Aide-de-Camp Edit

    : Chief Aide-de-Camp to the Emperor : Chief Aide-de Camp to the Emperor : Aide-de-Camp to the Emperor : Senior Aide-de-Camp to the Emperor : Aide-de-Camp to the Emperor : Aide-de-Camp to the Emperor : Aide-de-Camp to the Emperor : Aide-de-Camp to the Emperor : Aide-de-Camp to Prince Kotohito Kanin : Aide-de-Camp to Prince Yasuhito Chichibu : Aide-de-Camp/Adjutant to Field Marshal (Prince) Nashimoto : Aide-de-camp of Commander Komatsubara during Nomonhan Incident

Grand Chamberlain Edit

House of Representatives Edit

House of Peers Edit

    : Member in House of Peers : Member of House of Peers (partner of government policies in first stages) : Imperial candidate to House of Peers : Member of House of Peers : Member in House of Peers : Member in House of Peers : Member in House of Peers

Supreme Commander-in-Chief of Armed Imperial Forces

He also led the Imperial Supreme War Council conferences and meetings, in some cases a member of the Imperial Family was sent to represent him at such strategic conferences.

Imperial General Headquarters (Dai Honei) Edit

Japanese Army Strategic Thought Group

Aide to War Minister, IGHQ

    : Army Staff officer, IGHQ : Army Staff officer, IGHQ : concurrently Army Staff Officer, IGHQ : Army Staff Officer, IGHQ : Army Staff officer IGHQ

Operations Bureau's Organization and Mobilization Section, IGHQ

    : Chief of Operations Bureau's Organization and Mobilization Section, IGHQ : Chief of Operations Bureau's Organization and Mobilization Section, IGHQ

Russian Section of Intelligence Department, IGHQ

Army Inner Liaison (Army Section), Military Affairs Bureau, Army Ministry, IGHQ

    : Chief of Army General Staff : Chief of Army General Staff : Chief of Army General Staff : Chief of Army General Staff

Army Regional Commands

Army Tactical Commands

General Command of Southern Army

Army Tactical Commands

Army High Level Inner Liaison with Army General Staff, IGHQ

    : Chief, First Bureau, Army General Staff Headquarters, attended operational liaison conference between IGHQ, Southern Army, and Fourteenth Area Army (Manila)

Japanese Navy Strategic Thinking Group

    : Chief of Navy General Staff : Chief of Navy General Staff : Chief of Navy General Staff : Chief of Navy General Staff : Chief of Navy General Staff : Vice-Chief of Navy General Staff

Navy General Staff of Combined Fleet (Japan, later Truk HQ)

    : Chief of General Staff of Combined Fleet : Vice-Chief of General Staff of Combined Fleet : Chief of General Staff of Combined Fleet : Vice-Chief of General Staff of Combined Fleet

Navy Tactical Commands

Navy-Army General Staff (IGHQ) Liaison Officer

    : Member (Army-Navy high level liaison), Naval General Staff Naval Staff Officer (Operations) IGHQ Section Chief (Operations), Army General Staff, IGHQ Army Section Member, Naval General Staff Naval Staff Officer, IGHQ (Operations). : Chief, Second Section, (Army-Navy high level liaison) Army General Staff Headquarters Staff Officer, IGHQ (Navy Section)
    : Vice-Chief Inspectorate General of Military Training : Inspector General of Military Training : Inspector General of Artillery Training : Inspector General of Signal Training : Deputy Chief, Inspectorate General of Military Training : Department Chief, Inspectorate General of Military Training : Section Member, Inspectorate General of Military Training : Artillery Department, Office of Military Training : Section Member, Inspectorate General of Military Training : Office of Military Training : Section Chief, Office of Military Training also Inspector General of Military Training : Inspector General of Military Training : Member, Inspectorate General of Military Training : Member, Inspectorate General of Military Training : Section Chief, Inspectorate General of Military Training : Inspector General of Artillery Training : Chief, 2nd Section, Inspectorate General of Military Training : Section Member, Inspectorate General of Military Training : Inspector General of Military Training : Office of Cavalry Training (Inspectorate General of Military Training) : Attached to Inspectorate-General of Military Training : Inspector-General of Military Training : Inspector-General of Military Training
    : Inspector general of Army Aviation : Inspector general of Army Aviation : Deputy Chief, Inspectorate General of Air Force : Inspector General of Army Aviation : Inspector General of Army Aviation : Inspector General of Army Aviation

Imperial Supreme War Council (Senso-shi-do) Edit

Chief Secretary of Supreme War Council

Supreme War Councilor

    : Appointed to the Supreme War Council : Supreme War Councilor : Supreme War Councilor : Appointed to Supreme War Council : Supreme War Councilor : Member of the Supreme War Council : Member of the Supreme War Council : Member Supreme War Council : Member Supreme War Council : Member Supreme War Council : Member Supreme War Council : Member Supreme War Council : Member Supreme War Council : Member Supreme War Council : Member of the Supreme War Council : Member of the Supreme War Council : Member of the Supreme War Council : Member of the Supreme War Council : Member of the Supreme War Council : Member of the Supreme War Council : Member of the Supreme War Council : Member of the Supreme War Council : Member of the Supreme War Council : Member of the Supreme War Council : Member of the Supreme War Council : Member of the Supreme War Council
    : Military Councilor : Military Councilor : Military Councilor : concurrently Military Councilor : concurrently Military Councilor : Military Councilor : Military Councilor : Military Councilor : Military Councilor : Military Councilor : Military Councilor : Military Councilor : Military Councilor : Military Councillor

President of the Imperial Throne Council of War

Imperial War Councilor

Home Defense Headquarters Edit

  • Fifth Area Army and Northern Army District (Sapporo)
  • Eleventh Area Army and Northeastern Army District (Sendai)
  • Twelfth Area Army and Eastern Army District (Tokyo)
  • Thirteenth Area Army and Tokai Army District (Nagoya)
  • Fifteenth Area Army and Central Army District (Osaka)
  • Shikoku Army District (Zentsuji)
  • Sixteenth Area Army and Western Army District (Fukuoka)
  • Seventeenth Area Army and Korea Army District (Seoul)
  • Tenth Area Army and Formosa Army District (Taipei) , Nagano Prefecture

Tokyo metropolitan area Edit

    : Governor of the Tokyo metropolitan area also was commander of civil law enforcement divisions in the metropolitan area, including Keishicho, Tokkō, Kempeitai and Tokeitai metropolitan units. The Imperial Guards remained under their own commander, who reported directly to the Emperor.

Tokyo Divisional District Edit

Tokyo Defense Command Edit

Tokyo Garrison Headquarters Edit

Tokyo Bay Fortress Detachment Officers Edit

    : Commanding General, Tokyo Bay Fortress, concurrently Commanding General, Tokyo Bay Detachment : Staff Officer, Tokyo Bay Fortress Detachment

Maizuru Fortified Zone Edit

Tsushima Fortress Detachment Edit

Officer assigned to General Defense Command Edit

Shinbu Group (Fourteenth Area Army command) Edit

Northeastern Army District Headquarters (Japan Proper) Edit

Northern District Army Command Edit

Western Army District HQ Edit

Western District Army Command Edit

Central District Army Headquarters Edit

Central District Army Command Edit

Chosen Army District Edit

Munitions Minister Edit

    : Concurrent chief of the Munitions Ministry, as Army figure in same Ministry : As sometimes replaced at Gen Tojo in lead of Munitions Minister : in charge of the Munitions Ministry : Munitions Minister : Marine and Munitions Ministry, as Navy figure in such Ministry : Chief of naval aviation development, a division of the Munitions Ministry also father of the "Kamikaze" special forces : Munitions Minister and aircraft industrialist as linked with Army

Material Section, War Ministry Edit

Sagami Army Arsenal Edit

Tokyo Army Arsenal Edit

Army Remount Department Edit

Inspector General of Chemical Warfare Edit

Officer in Inspectorate General Edit

Army Section, Imperial General Headquarters Edit

Ōita PW Internment Camp Staff Edit

Army Allied Prisoner of War Information Bureau Edit

Army Commanders of Military Prisons and POW Camps in occupied territories

  • Lieutenant-General Igatu: General Officer Commanding Prisoner of War Camps Philippines
  • Shinpei Fukei: Commandant Prisoner of War Camps, Singapore
  • Major-General Arimina: Commandant Changi Jail, Singapore

War Minister Edit

    : Minister of War : Minister of War : Minister of War : Minister of War : Minister of War : Minister of War : Minister of War : Minister of War : Minister of War : Minister of War : Minister of War : Minister of War : Minister of War : Minister of War

Deputy Minister of War Edit

Vice-Minister of War Edit

    : Vice-Minister of War : Vice-Minister of War : Vice-Minister of War : Vice-Minister of War : War Vice-Minister : Vice-Minister of War : Vice-Minister of War : War Vice-Minister : War Vice-Minister : War Vice-Minister : War Vice-Minister : War Vice-Minister

Secretary to the War Minister Edit

    : Secretary to War Minister concurrently Adjutant in the same Ministry Aide to the War Minister Staff Officer, Tokyo Garrison Command : Secretary to the War Minister Adjutant, War Ministry : Aide to War Minister, IGHQ : Adjutant to the War Minister : Secretary to the War Minister Adjutant, War Ministry : Adjutant, War Ministry Secretary to the War Minister Governor, Tokyo Metropolitan area : Senior Adjutant, War Ministry : Secretary to the War Minister

Military Affairs Bureau, War Ministry Edit

    : Chief, Army Affairs Bureau : Member, Army Affairs Section : Chief, Military Affairs Bureau : Chief, Military Affairs Bureau, War Ministry : Member, Military Affairs Bureau, War Ministry : Chief, Military Administration Bureau, War Ministry : Chief of the Domestic affairs section of the Military Affairs Bureau : Chief of Army Affairs Section, Military Affairs Bureau, Ministry of War and Head of Military Affairs Bureau, in same Ministry : Head of Military Affairs Bureau, Ministry of War : Officer in Military Affairs Section : assigned to the Military Affairs Bureau : Member, Military Affairs Bureau : Military Affairs Bureau, War Ministry : Chief, Military Affairs Bureau : Member, Military Affairs Bureau, War Ministry : Section Member, Military Affairs Bureau : Member, Military Affairs Bureau, War Ministry : Member, Military Affairs Bureau, War Ministry : Member, Military Affairs Bureau, War Ministry : Chief, Military Affairs Bureau : Military Affairs Bureau, War Ministry : Chief, Military Affairs Bureau : Member, Military Affairs Bureau : Member, Military Affairs Bureau, War Ministry : Member, Military Affairs Bureau : Member, Military Affairs Bureau, War Ministry : Member and Chief, Army Affairs Section, Military Affairs Bureau, War Ministry : Chief, Defense Section, Military Affairs Bureau, War Ministry : Military Affairs Bureau, War Ministry : Head of Military Affairs Bureau, Ministry of War : Attached to Military Affairs Bureau, Ministry of War

Economic Mobilization Bureau in War Ministry and related sections Edit

    : Section Chief (Conscription), War Ministry : Section Chief, Economic Mobilization Bureau : Chief, Materiel Mobilization Bureau, War Ministry : Section Chief, Economic Mobilization Bureau, War Ministry : attached to Army Technical Department
  • Toshishiro Obata: Chief, Operations Bureau, Army General Staff : Member, War Ministry Maintenance section Chief, Army Affairs Section, Military Affairs Bureau, War Ministry : Ordnance Bureau, War Ministry, Army Ordnance Main Depot, Mechanized Department : Army Ordnance, Administration Department : Chief, Military Affairs Bureau, War Ministry : Military Affairs Bureau concurrently Member of the Cabinet Research Board : Chief, Military Service Section, War Ministry : Ordnance Bureau, War Ministry : Economic Mobilization Bureau, War Ministry Section Chief, Planning Bureau, Cabinet Resources Board

Personal Bureau of War Ministry Edit

    : Member, Personnel Bureau : Chief, Personnel Bureau : Chief, Assignments Section, Personnel Bureau, War Ministry : Chief, Personnel Bureau, War Ministry : attached to Personnel Bureau, War Ministry : Chief, Personnel Bureau

Press Relations Branch, Ministry of War Edit

Army Field Marshal Edit

    :- Field Marshal :- Field Marshal :- Field Marshal :- Field Marshal :- Field Marshal :- Field Marshal :- Field Marshal

Provost Marshal General Edit

    : Provost Marshal General : Provost Marshal General (LtGen) : Provost Marshal General : Provost Marshal General, later the Japanese first priest in Shintoist central Shrine in Hsinking, led the Cultural Japanese entity in Manchukuo, amongst operative leader of Manchoukouan Intelligence services.

General Affairs Bureau, Provost Marshal Headquarters Edit

Inspectorate General of Military Training Edit

    : Vice-Chief Inspectorate General of Military Training : Inspector General of Military Training : Inspector General of Artillery Training : Inspector General of Signal Training : Deputy Chief, Inspectorate General of Military Training : Department Chief, Inspectorate General of Military Training : Section Member, Inspectorate General of Military Training : Artillery Department, Office of Military Training : Section Member, Inspectorate General of Military Training : Office of Military Training : Section Chief, Office of Military Training also Inspector General of Military Training : Member, Inspectorate General of Military Training : Member, Inspectorate General of Military Training : Section Chief, Inspectorate General of Military Training : Inspector General of Artillery Training : Chief, 2nd Section, Inspectorate General of Military Training : Section Member, Inspectorate General of Military Training : Inspector General of Military Training : Office of Cavalry Training (Inspectorate General of Military Training) : Inspector-General of Cavalry Training

Imperial Army-Navy military teaching and training services units Edit

Army Officers in Reserve list Edit

    : retired, March 1936, later enter in politic activities : placed on reserve list, 1936, later recalled : In 1936 put on reserve list with rank of general : transferred to reserve list, January 1941 recalled to active duty : retired, April 1945 recalled to active duty : transferred to First Reserve List, August 1943 : retired, December 1944 later recalled : retired, 1938 recalled to active duty, 1938–40 : unassigned list, March 1943 transferred to first reserve list, April 1943 : transferred to first reserve list : retired, December 1944 : placed on reserve list, 1942 : retired, April 1945 recalled to active duty : relieved of all military and political posts, July 1944 retired to first reserve list : transferred to first reserve list (Formosa), May 1945 : retired to first reserve list, July 1938 : Was entered on Reserve list (1939), for later retirement to civilian life (1939). He was called to operational service during 1944-45.

Deputy Chief of Army General Staff Edit

    : Senior Deputy Chief of Army General Staff : Second Deputy Chief of Army General Staff : Deputy Chief of Army General Staff : Deputy Chief of Army General Staff

Chief of Army General Staff Edit

    : Chief of the Army General Staff : Chief of Army General Staff : Chief of Army General Staff : Chief of Army General Staff

Bureau Chief of Army General Staff Edit

1st Bureau Chief of Army General Staff Edit

2nd Bureau Chief of Army General Staff Edit

Vice Chief of Army General Staff Edit

Army General Staff Edit

20th Group - War Coordination, Army General Staff Edit

Operations Section, Army General Staff Edit

Third Section-Organization and Mobilization, Army General Staff Edit

    : Chief, Third Section (Organization and Mobilization), Army General Staff : Section Chief, Third Section (Organization and Mobilization), Army General Staff

Chief of General Intelligence Bureau in Army General Staff Edit

Second Bureau (Intelligence Division), Army General Staff Edit

    : Chief, Second Bureau (Intelligence Division), Army General Staff, at the time of the outbreak of the Pacific War. His staff consisted of Colonel Kotani, Navy officer Captain Onoda, and Mr.Yosano, Foreign Office Chancellor. : Chief, Second Bureau (Intelligence Division), Army General Staff : Chief of the Cryptographic Section (Intelligence Division), Army General Staff

Russian unit of Second Bureau (Intelligence Division) Army General Staff Edit

Japanese Army Intelligence Services units

    , the highest operative Chief in Japanese Army Intelligence Services in wartime as the underground, supreme chief and secret agent in Japanese Secret Service in Manchukuo as Operative Commander of Manchoukouan Secret services under the lead of Prince Takeda amongst Kempeitai services Staff Officer (Operations/Intelligence), Kwantung Army Chief, Special Service Agency, Hailar, Kwantung Army Chief of the Special Service Agency, Kwantung Army in Harbin leader of Special Services Agency in Manchukuo intelligence chief of Special Services Agency in Harbin for some time (Shinryo) chief of Special Services Agency in Harbin Directed the Mongol department of Kwantung Army in land and native saboteurs and secret agent units Chief of German Section of Japanese Military Intelligence in this period Led the Matsu Kikan (Pine Tree) Secret Agency, under command of 19th Army, with HQ in Ambon (Dutch Indies) intelligence officer sent by a unit of the Imperial Japanese Army to Tibet and Sinkiang

Army Technical Research Institute Edit

    :Director 9th Dept Army Technical Research Institute : Head of General Affairs Bureau in Technical Research Institute

Third Bureau (Logistics), Army General Staff Edit

Railways and Shipping section, Army General Staff Edit

Army Ordnance and Army Shipping Department Edit

    : Commanding General, Shipping Transportation Headquarters : Army Ordnance, Administration Department Chief, Army Shipping Department Shipping Transportation Headquarters : General Officer Commanding Army Maritime Transport Command : Commanding Officer 13th Shipping Group

Chairman of the Military Affairs Bureau Edit

    : Military Affairs Bureau and Economic Mobilization Bureau : Chief of the Military Affairs Bureau, Government Planning Board : Chief, Military Administration Section, Military Administration Bureau : Military Affairs Bureau : Chief, Military Affairs Section, War Ministry : Chief, Army Affairs Section, Military Affairs Bureau : Chief, Army Affairs Section, War Ministry : Chief, General Affairs Bureau : Section Chief, Military Affairs Bureau : Military Affairs Bureau and Military Administration Bureau member Military Administration Bureau : Section Member, Military Affairs Bureau Inspector General of Chemical Warfare : Chief, Defense Section, Military Affairs Bureau, War Ministry

Commanders Officer Army Home Stations Edit

    : Commanding Officer Tokyo Home Station : Commanding Officer Tsu Home Station, Commanding Officer Ujiyamada Home Station, Commanding Officer Yokkaichi Home Station : Commanding Officer Shibata Home Station : Commanding Officer Ashigawa Home Station and Commanding Officer Obihiro Home Station : Commanding Officer Akita Home Station : Commanding Officer Wakamatsu Home Station : Commanding Officer Kofu Home Station : Commanding Officer Matsumo Home Station, Commanding Officer Muramatsu Home Station and Commanding Officer Takeda Home Station

Army Aeronautical Department Edit

Administrative Chief of Administrative Division, Army Aeronautical Department

    : Chief, Army Aeronautical Department : Chief, Administrative Division, Army Aeronautical Department : Chief, Administrative Division, Army Aeronautical Department : Chief Administrative Division, Army Aeronautical Department : Chief Administrative Division, Army Aeronautical Department : Chief, Administrative Division, Army Aeronautical Department : Member, Administrative Division, Army Aeronautical Department : Chief, Administrative Division, Army Aeronautical Department : Chief, Administrative Division, Army Aeronautical Department : Attached to Administration, Army Aeronautical Department, Ministry of War

Chief of the Army Aviation Headquarters

Inspectorate General of Army Air Force

    : Inspector General of Army Aviation : Inspector General of Army Aviation : Inspector General of Army Aviation : Deputy Chief, Inspectorate General of Air Force : Inspector General of Army Aviation : Inspector General of Army Aviation

Air Armies General Commanders

    : Commanding General, Air General Army, (took charge of Army air operations in homeland, Chosen and Ryukyus) : Commanding General, First Air Army : Commanding General, Second Air Army (Manchuria) : Third Air Army General Commander : Third Air Army Commander and Sixth Air Army Commander. Between March and May 1945, General Sugawara was engaged in the Ten-Go Air Operation, under the Commander-in-Chief, Combined Fleet : Commanding General, Fourth Air Army : Fourth Air Army Commander : At end of World War II, he was Commanding General (LtGen), Fifth Air Army, stationed in Seoul, Chosen : General Officer Commanding 1st Air Army

Air Groups Commanders

    : First Air Group Commander : Commanding General, Second Air Group (LtGen) : Fifth Air Group Commander and Third Air Group Commander

Air Regiment Commanders

    : LtCol (Air Force), Regimental Commander, 6th Air Regiment (Colonel) : LtCol/Colonel (Air Force) Officer attached to 7th Air Regiment later 7th Air Regiment Commander : Regimental Commander, 8th Air Regiment (Colonel, Air Force) : Regimental Commander, 16th Air Regiment : Regimental Commander, 16th Air Regiment : Commanding Officer 1st Air Regiment

Air Force Brigade Commanders

Air Force Staff Officers

    : Member of Staff of the Air General Army : Chief of Staff, First Air Group : Staff Officer, Air Force : Department (MajGen), Staff Officer, Air Force administration

Officer Attached to Second Air Group HQ

Commanding Officer in Air Battalion

Acting General Officer Commanding Army Aviation Corps

    : Acting General Officer Commanding Army Aviation Corps and General Officer Commanding Army Aviation Corps

Air Force Commanders, Directors and instructors in Air Schools

    : Commandant, Akeno Army Air School, Commanding General, same school (MajGen) : Commandant, Shimoshizu Army Air School and Commandant, Military Air Academy and Air Training Army Commander : Director/Superintendent, Hamamatsu Army Air School (MajGen) : Instructor, Hamamatsu Army Air School : Commandant of Akeno Army Aviation School and Commandant of Tokorozawa Army Aviation School, Director of Training Department, Tokorozawa Army Aviation School, Commandant of Central Army Aviation School

Chief of Army Aeronautical Department (operative unit)

    : Chief, Army Aeronautical Department (MajGen) : Chief, Army Aeronautical Department : Chief, Army Aeronautical Department : Chief, Army Aeronautical Department

Deputy Chief of Army Aeronautical Department

Chief of Second Bureau, Army Aeronautical Department

Chief of Army Air Technical Laboratories

Technicals and Experts in Army Aeronautical Sciences

    : Major (Air Force) Section Chief, Army Aeronautical Department : LtCol (Air Force), Officer attached later member of Army Aeronautical Department : Officer attached to Army Air Technical Laboratories (MajGen) : Director of the Research Department, Tokorozawa Army Aviation School

Imperial Japanese Army Air Force units

64th Sentai units (Bangkok Airfield, 1941)

  • Major/Lieutenant Colonel Tateo Katō: Group leader
  • Captain Katsumi Anma: Group Leader
  • Sergeant Shigeaku Wakayama
  • Lieutenant Hiroshi Okuyama
  • Lieutenant Tadashi Kataoka
  • Captain Haruyasu Maruo
  • Captain Yasuiko Kuroe
  • Lieutenant Yohei Hinoki
  • Lieutenant Takeshi Endo
  • Sergeant Aikichi Misago
  • Sergeant Yoshiko Yasuda
  • Sergeant Chikara Goto

Kurai Chutai, 502nd Sentai unit (Nakatsu Airfield, 1945)

Hane Chutai, 2nd Air Army unit (Hsinking East Airfield, 1945)

Kwantung Army Commanders (until 1945) Edit

    : Commander in Chief Kwantung Army : Commander in Chief Kwantung Army : Commander of Kwantung Army : Commander of Kwantung Army : Commander of Kwantung Army : Commander of Kwantung Army, Prime Minister : Commander of Kwantung Army, War Vice Minister : Commander of Kwantung Army concurrently Official Ambassador to Manchukuo : Commander of Kwantung Army : Commander of Kwantung Army : Kwantung Army Headquarters Adviser, Manchukuoan Military Administration Bureau : Commander of Railway Sector Headquarters, Kwantung Army : Commander, Kwantung Army Railroad Command

Kwantung Government-General Administration Edit

    : Officer (Major), Kwantung Government-General : Army Staff Officer, Kwantung Government-General : Officer, assigned to Kwantung Government-General : Commandant of Port Arthur : Commander of Ryojun Naval Guard District and Station

For a complete structure see:

Structures in other Japanese armies Edit

Commander in Chief of Kempeitai units Edit

    : Since 1921-41 lead the Kempeitai operation inside Japan and Asia during wartimes : Military Police (Gendarmerie) Commander, China Forces : Commanding General, Military Police, Kwantung Army : Commander, Military Police : Deputy Chief, Military Police Headquarters : Chief, General Affairs Bureau Military Police Forces Headquarters Commander, Kwantung Army Military Police Units Commander, Military Police Forces (LtGen) : Chief, General Affairs Bureau, Military Police Headquarters, Kwantung Army Commander, Kwantung Army Military Police : General Officer Commanding Kempeitai unit, Chosen : Commander in Chief Kempeitai Forces, Tokyo Hq : Commanding Officer Kempeitai Section 25th Army, Sumatra

Tokeitai police service units Edit

Imperial Guards unit Edit

    : Company Commander, 1st Infantry Regiment, Imperial Guard Division, during Russo-Japanese War : Regimental Commander, 1st Infantry, Imperial Guard Division : Battalion Commander, 4th Imperial Guard Infantry Regiment : Regimental Commander, 4th Infantry, Imperial Guard Division, General Officer Commanding 2nd Imperial Guards Division : Regimental Commander, 3rd Imperial Guards (Colonel) Chief of Staff, Imperial Guard Regiment Chief of Staff, Imperial Guard Division : Regimental Commander, 2nd Imperial Guards unit : Imperial Guard Division Commander : Infantry Regiment Commander, 2nd Imperial Guards : Imperial Guard Division Commander 2nd Imperial Guard Division Commander : Commanding Officer, Transportation Regiment, Imperial Guard Division : Commander, Imperial Guard Cavalry Regiment Commander, Imperial Guard Reconnaissance Regiment : Commanding General, 2nd Imperial Guard Depot Division (LtGen) : Commanding General, 1st Imperial Guard Division, killed during abortive coup d'état launched against him at Imperial Palace Chief of Staff 2nd Imperial Guards Division, Malaya : Commanding Officer 5th Imperial Guards Regiment, Malaya : Chief Military Affairs Department 1st Imperial Guards Division : General Officer Commanding 1st Imperial Guards Division, Tokyo : General Officer Commanding 1st Imperial Guards Division : Commanding Officer 3rd Imperial Guards Brigade : General Officer Commanding Imperial Guards Division, China : Commanding Officer 2nd Imperial Guards Brigade : Commanding Officer Imperial Guards Artillery Regiment : General Officer Commanding 2nd Imperial Guards Depot Division : General Officer Commanding Imperial Guards Division : Chief of Staff, First Imperial Guards Division in Eastern District Army

Commander of Keishicho Civil Police forces Edit

    : Governor of the Tokyo metropolitan area : Home Affairs Minister : Home Affairs Minister : Home Affairs Minister : Home Affairs Minister : Home Affairs Minister : Justice Ministry : Justice Ministry : Justice Minister

Operative Chief of Keishicho Civil Police units Edit

Tokko police service unit Edit

    : Since 1921-41 lead the State Police (Tokko) operations inside Japan and Asia during wartimes : underground unit, in Censorship department in Tokko Intelligence service, in Tokyo, Japan

War Relief Association Edit

Marine Ministers Edit

    : Ministry of the Navy of Japan Commandant in Kure and Yokosuka Naval Districts Commander, China Navy Area Fleet Chief of Naval General Staff : Marine Minister : Marine minister : Marine Minister : Marine Minister : Marine Minister : Marine Minister Commander-in-Chief, First Expeditionary Fleet (Yangtze River) Commander Yokosuka and Sasebo Naval District Commander-in-Chief, Combined Fleet Imperial and Supreme War Councilor Ex-Prime Minister and political adviser

Vice-Marine Ministers Edit

Private Secretary to the Minister of the Navy Edit

Navy Admirals of the Fleet Edit

Navy Admirals Edit

Navy Staff College's Research Department Edit

Third Department in Marine Ministry Edit

Bureau of Naval Affairs Edit

Bureau of Naval Supply Edit

Bureau of Naval Accounting Edit

Naval Aviation Bureau Edit

    : Chief of Naval Aviation Bureau : Officer of Naval Aviation Bureau. Created some plans for bombing strikes against territory of the United States

Imperial Japanese Navy Air Force units

Fighter Unit (Carrier Akagi, 1941)

Tainan Air Corps (Denpasar Airfield, 1942)

Yokosuka Air Corps (Yokosuka Airfield, 1943)

253rd Air Corps (Rabaul Airfield, 1944)

303 Squadron, 203rd Air Corps (Kagoshima Airfield, 1945)

Navy General Staff's Intelligence Division Edit

Japanese Navy Secret Service units

    :- Operative leader of Joho Kyoko (Japanese naval intelligence) and Tokeitai (naval military police) : Navy figure, in the Second Bureau (Intelligence Division), Japanese Army : Commander in Japanese Navy Secret services. Directed the 8th Section "Yashika". Between this unit stay the "Tokyo Gimusho" office (the "Australian Section") linked with Japanese Naval Intelligence Staff under command of Imperial Navy General Staff. The office had orders to researching any affairs of the British Empire in Southeast Asia and Pacific Area.

Japanese Imperial Navy's Advisory Bureau on Jewish Affairs Edit

Operation Section of Naval General Staff Edit

Plans Division Office of Operation Section in Naval General Staff Edit

    : Chief in Plans Division Office of Operation Section in Naval General Staffhe was proposer and support plans for Australian Invasion.

Naval Research Section Edit

Technical Council in Navy Technical Department Edit

Naval Aviation Development Division in Munitions Ministry Edit

    : Chief of the Naval Aviation Development Division in the Munitions Ministry was the Japanese Navy figure in same ministry

President of Japanese Naval Staff College Edit

Navy Officers in Reserve list Edit

Chief of Naval General Staff Edit

    : Chief of Naval General Staff : Chief of Naval General Staff : Chief of Naval General Staff : Chief of Naval General Staff S,, 2 Chief of Naval General Staff : Chief of Naval General Staff : Chief of Naval General Staff : Chief of Naval General Staff

Staff Officer of Naval General Staff Edit

Vice-Chief of Naval General Staff Edit

    : Vice-Chief, Naval General Staff : Vice-Chief of Naval Staff : Vice-Chief of Naval Staff : Vice-Chief of the Naval General Staff

Naval General Staff Edit

    : Member, Naval General Staff : Member, Naval General Staff : Member, Naval General Staff : Member, Naval General Staff : Officer attached to Naval General Staff

Commander-in-Chief of Combined Fleet Edit

    : Commander-in-Chief of Combined Fleet, : Commander-in-Chief, Combined Fleet and, concurrently, First Fleet : Chief of Staff 1st Fleet—Chief of Staff, Combined Fleet : Commander-in-Chief of the Combined Fleet : Commander-in-Chief of the Combined Fleet : Commander-in-Chief of the Combined Fleet : Commander-in-Chief of the Combined Fleet

Vice-Commander of Combined Fleet Edit

Chief of Staff of Combined Fleet Edit

    : Chief of Staff of the Combined Fleet : Chief of Staff of the Combined Fleet : Chief of Staff of the Combined Fleet

Commander of First Naval Fleet Edit

Commander of 2nd Naval Fleet Edit

Commander of 3rd Naval Fleet Edit

First Naval Air Fleet Edit

    : Commander of the First Naval Air Fleet : Commander of the First Naval Air Fleet : Commander of the First Naval Air Fleet : Commander of the First Naval Air Fleet

Senior Staff Officer of the First Naval Air Fleet Edit

Second Navy Air Fleet Edit

Fifth Navy Air Fleet Edit

11th Navy Air Fleet Edit

26th Air Flotilla Edit

Fourth Naval Fleet Edit

Eighth Naval Fleet Edit

Third Destroyer Flotilla Edit

China Navy Area Fleet Edit

1st Carrier Division Edit

Carrier Division Three Edit

1st CarDiv Edit

2nd Carrier Unit Edit

3rd Destroyer Flotilla Edit

2nd Destroyer Group Edit

10th Destroyer Flotilla Edit

10th Destroyer Unit Edit

22nd Destroyer Division Edit

6th Destroyer Flotilla Edit

2nd Destroyer Unit Edit

3rd Destroyer Flotilla Edit

4th Destroyer Division Edit

4th Destroyer Flotilla Edit

5th Cruiser Division Edit

18th Cruiser Division Edit

8th Cruiser Division Edit

6th Cruiser Division Edit

4th Cruiser Division (1st section) Edit

5th Cruiser Division Edit

7th Cruiser Division Edit

1st Battleship Division Edit

3rd Battleship Division (1st section) Edit

3rd Submarine Sqdn Edit

5th Submarine Sqdn Edit

13th Submarine Sqdn Edit

First Submarine Fleet Edit

Sixth Submarine Fleet Edit

1st Transport Group Edit

2nd Transport Group Edit

3rd Transport Group Edit

Seaplane Tender Group Edit

Minesweeper Group Edit

First Naval Striking Force Edit

Officer in Japanese Vessel Raiders Force(1941-42) Edit

    : He assigned the lead of Aikoku Maru, unit in Japanese Vessel Raiders Force during the Navy Raiding campaign in the Indian Seas area.
  • See List of Japanese Auxiliary Cruiser Commerce Raiders

Sasebo 7th Special Naval Landing Force Edit

Chief of Staff of the Maizuru Naval Base Edit

First Naval District Edit

Kure and Yokosuka Naval Districts Edit

Sasebo Naval District Edit

Sasebo Naval Yard Edit

Yokosuka Naval Base Edit

Kure Naval Base Edit

Chinkai Naval Station (Chosen) Edit

Ryojun Naval Station (Kwantung) Edit

Kodoha ideological advisers in government Edit

Chief of Cabinet Secretary Edit

Welfare Minister) Edit

    : Education, Welfare and Home Minister, as well as chief secretary to the Naidaijin and last proper Naidaijin (Lord Keeper of the Privy Seal). He is recognised as one of the principal supporters of General Tojo's policies. During his period as Home Affairs Minister, he commanded the Keishicho (Tokyo Metropolitan Police Department), and national civil police forces.

Minister of Education Edit

    : charge of Minister of Education Company Commander, 1st Infantry Regiment, Imperial Guard Division, during the Russo-Japanese War principal nationalist thinker and right-wing political adviser in the country War minister founder of Kokuhonsha (Society for the Foundation of the State) right-wing secret society : Minister of Education : concurrently Minister of Education

Imperial Youth Federation/Imperial Youth Corps Edit

    : Imperial Youth Federation and Imperial Youth Corps Chief in charge of young nationalist and militarists local indoctrination, following official doctrines amongst Minister of Education policies.

Minister of State Affairs Edit

Finance Minister Edit

    : Finance Minister, also opium dealer to the Chinese and government supporter : Finance Minister Minister of Finance. : Finance Minister (with Sumitomo Clan Links) : Ex-Finance Minister, also political adviser (other figure of Zaibatsu groups in government)

Government Finances and Economics Entities Edit

'National Economic policies'

    : Political Adviser charged with composing new economic policies, and Chief of Economic Project Department and Chief of Cabinet Secretary

'Planning Bureau in Cabinet Resources Board'

'Member in Cabinet Research Board'

'Imperial Planning Institute'

'1st Department, Planning Institute (Cabinet Research Board Unit)'

'Cabinet Planning Board'

    : President of Cabinet Planning Board : President of Central Government Cabinet Planning Board for sometimes : President of the Cabinet Planning Board, Minister of State (Without Portfolio) also providing guidance for Wang Ching-wei's new regime at Nanking, also Imperial nominee to the House of Peers

'First Bureau, Cabinet Planning Board'

'General Affairs Bureau, Cabinet Planning Board'

'Secretary-General of the Asia Development Board'

'Political Affairs Section of the Asia Development Board'

    : first Chief of the Political Affairs Section of the Asia Development Board (China Affairs Board) : Chief of Political Affairs Section of the Asia Development Board

Commerce and Industry Minister Edit

    : Commerce and Industry Ministry (also chairman of Tokyo Gasu Denky) ardent follower of Hitler´s doctrines : Commerce and Industry Minister (Army figure in government) : Commerce and Industry, Foreign Affairs Minister and Marine Minister, (with Mitsui Clan connection) : Minister of Commerce and Industry : Minister of Commerce and Industry : Minister of Commerce and Industry

Government Industry, Commerce and Trading Organizations Edit

    : Vice-president of "Nan-yo Kyokai" (South Seas Society), as government-Navy Trade Agency in South Seas Mandate

Minister of Trade Edit

Minister of State (without portfolio) Edit

    : Minister of State (Without portfolio) in central government : Minister of State without Portfolio : Minister of State without Portfolio : Minister of State without Portfolio

Minister of Agriculture Edit

Communications Minister Edit

    : Communications Minister (president of Osaka Shosen Kaisha Company, insider of Sumitomo Clan) : Chief of Information Department : Ex servant in Foreign Affairs Ministry was Official Government spokesman
    : Official Journalist in Asahi Shimbun and Japan Times and Advertiser : Official journalist in Asahi Shimbun : Official Journalist and Director in Japan Times and Mail : Official journalist in Chungai Shogyo

'Support writers and military experts'

'Official war correspondent'

President of International Cultural Relations Society Edit

Justice Minister Edit

    : Justice Minister, Fumimaro Konoye partner, led the Keishicho (Tokyo Metropolitan Police Department) : Justice Minister commander of the Keishicho (Tokyo Metropolitan Police Department), and leader in Taisei Yokusankai (Imperial Rule Assistance Association) group : Minister of Justice for sometimes

Home Affairs Minister Edit

    : Home Affairs Minister founder of Kokusui-kai, one of Yakuza organization. [9] : Prime Minister, with Japanese Navy support also Home Affairs Minister also chief of the Keishicho (Tokyo Metropolitan Police Department), also founder and leader in the "Shintoist Rites Research Council" organization : Home Affairs Minister : Home Affairs Minister : Home Affairs Minister : Home Affairs Minister

Diet members Edit

    : was a Diet member who co-signed the declaration of war against the United States : Member of Diet (Parliament), supporter of State Shintoism : Right-wing ideologist, also Imperial Youth Federation and Imperial Youth Corps leader in charge of young nationalist and militarists local indoctrination, member of House of Representatives of Japan and vice-president of Diet instigator of the Second Sino-Japanese War.

Foreign Affairs Minister Edit

    : Foreign Affair Minister Foreign Affairs Minister : concurrently Minister of Foreign Affairs : Foreign Minister : Foreign Minister : Foreign Minister : Minister of Foreign Affairs : Foreign Affairs Minister : Foreign Affairs Minister, believer in the Axis Powers alliance : Foreign Affairs Minister : Foreign Affairs Minister, also Japanese Ambassador in United States

Foreign Affairs Officers Edit

    : High-ranking official in Foreign Affairs Ministry : Official of the Research Section of Ministry of Foreign Affairs : Foreign Affairs officer, also intelligence unit when serving as liaison between the Japanese Foreign Office and the Admiralty a Black Dragon Society member : Foreign Office high-ranking officialas liaison in IGHQ-Army/Navy Intelligence section. : Foreign Office high-ranking official : Foreign Ministry high-ranking official : Foreign Ministry high-ranking official, and Civil Government expert in Jews Affairs in wartimes

Foreign Affairs Officers on Diplomatic Missions Edit

    : Industrialist and Government supporter in Diplomatic Mission to Ducht Indies (1940) : Army attaché and Diplomatic in Matsuoka's mission to Europe and Russia : Army attaché and Foreign Affairs officer, provided diplomatic support to the Washington mission : special aide to Nomura Mission to Washington : special ambassador in diplomatic mission to Washington

Overseas ambassadors Edit

    : Ambassador to Nanking-China : Foreign Affairs Minister, also Japanese Ambassador in United States : a one-time Japanese ambassador to Italy : Foreign Affairs Minister Japanese Ambassador to Italy, diplomatic advisor and firm supporter of the Axis Powers alliance : Japanese ambassador in Italy and England : Japanese Ambassador to Germany, also right-wing follower and military attaché working for alliance between Japan and Nazi Germany (Anti-Comintern Pact, 1937 Tripartite Alliance, 1940) : Japanese Ambassador in France for some time : wartime Japanese Ambassador to the U.S.S.R. : Official Japanese Ambassador in Peiping (until 1937) and French Indochina in 1940-41 : Japan's Ambassador in Spain : Japanese Ambassador in Portugal : Diplomat Officer, Japanese Embassy in British Malaya : Kwantung Army - concurrently Ambassador to Manchukuo : Kwantung Army - Ambassador to Manchukuo : Japanese Ambassador in Nanjing during Wang Jingwei administration : Japanese Diplomatic Officer in Brisbane, Australia Special Envoy to diplomatic mission to Australia

Military attachés in foreign service Edit

Japanese Overseas Consul-Generals Edit

    was European Honorary-Consul at Japanese service in Brisbane Japanese Consul-General in Sydney : Japanese Consul-General in Batavia (before 1941) : Japanese Consul-General in Batavia : Japanese Consul-General in Honolulu : Japanese Consul-General in Kovno, Lithuania

Japanese Overseas Affairs Minister Edit

    : Ministry of Greater East Asia (Japan) : Ministry of Greater East Asia (Japan) : Minister for Colonization, later the Ministry of Greater East Asia (Japan)

Political Affairs Section of the Asia Development Board Edit

    : Chief of the Political Affairs Section of the Asia Development Board (China Affairs Board), Secretary-General of the Asia Development Board

Governor-General in Exterior Provinces (1944-45) Edit

    : Governor-General of Chosen (Korea) : Governor-General of Kwantung Leased Territory : Governor-General of Karafuto (Sakhalin) : Governor-General of Taiwan (Formosa) : Governor-General of South Pacific Mandate (Micronesia)

Tibetan Department (1942) Edit

Japanese and foreign politician and military experts related to Buddhist and Tibetan topics group inside of foreign affairs ministry during 1942, for research the possibility of any operations or incursion in Tibet: [ clarification needed ]

Military and Civil experts (Jewish & Manchurian Think Tank Groups) Edit

  • Captain Inuzuka Koreshige: Japanese Imperial Navy's Advisory Bureau on Jewish Affairs from March 1939 until April 1942.
  • Colonel Yasue Norihiro: Army expert in Jewish topics and anti-Semitic ideology, believing strongly in the Protocols of the Elders of Zion. : Foreign Ministry high-ranking official :Government Officer, the only Japanese in the world at the time to speak and read Hebrew.
  • Lieutenant-Colonel Ishiwara Kanji
  • Colonel Seishirō Itagaki
  • Industrialist Yoshisuke Aikawa
  • Japanese Consul in Kovno, Lithuania, Chiune Sugihara
  • General Kiichiro Higuchi: Japanese Army contact with Manchu Jew anticommunist movement and its supporter.

East Jew leader and Japanese supporter in Manchukuo Edit

1938 Five Minister Conference Edit

At the 1938 Five Ministers' Conference, five of the most powerful men in Japan gathered to discuss the ideas and plans of their 'Jewish experts'.


“The Flying Cigar” – Mitsubishi G4M “Betty” in 28 PHOTOS

The G4M was a Japanese high-speed bomber-torpedo carrier. During World War 2, it was in service with the naval aviation. In the system of codes of allies, this aircraft had the designation “Betty”. The Mitsubishi G4M combines high speed, long range, and excellent aerodynamic shape. Due to these qualities, it was a symbol of Japanese naval aviation.

The basis for the aircraft was a monoplane scheme with a mid mounted wing and a large fuselage. The large fuselage of the oval section allowed to accommodate large loads and created comfortable working conditions for the crew. The wings of the aircraft had a trapezoidal shape, and the average position of the wings allowed even at high load to keep the centering of the aircraft. The wing profile is “Mitsubishi” MAC 118.

Surrender of Japan, August-September 1945. After circling three times, a Japanese Mitsubishi G4M “Betty” which carried the envoys from Japan landed at Ie Shima airfield.

On the G4M, instead of hydraulic drives, electric drives were used. They seemed more reliable in conditions of low temperatures and high altitudes. The design was all metal with two spars and a retractable landing gear.

The power plant consisted of two, star-shaped two-row 14-cylinder air-cooled “Kasey” 11 engines. The maximum power of the engine was about 1530 hp (take-off). The engines were additionally equipped with a single-stage supercharger. The maximum speed was about 428 km/h. The G4M was equipped with screws with three blades and a diameter of 3.4 meters.

An Imperial Japanese Navy Mitsubishi G4M “Betty” bomber (probably a G4M2a Model 24 Ko Otsu) pictured somewhere in the Southwest Pacific. Note the radar antenna.

Fuel equipment included eight fuel tanks with a total capacity of 4780 liters. They were located between the wing spars, electric gasoline pumps, and fuel lines. The maximum range was 6034 km, and an altitude of 9220 m.

Small arms included four 7.69mm “Type 92” machine guns and one 20mm cannon. Machine guns were placed in the cockpit of the navigator, in two lateral and upper blisters. Type 92 Machineguns were a copy of the English Vickers machine gun. The ammunition was from six to seven disc stores for each shooting point. On the ceiling between the blisters could be attached one spare machine gun.

Japanese Navy Type 1 land attack planes (Mitsubishi G4M1 “Betty”) fly low through anti-aircraft gunfire during a torpedo attack on U.S. Navy ships maneuvering between Guadalcanal and Tulagi in the morning of 8 August 1942. The burning ship in the center distance is probably USS George F. Elliott (AP-13), which was hit by a crashing Japanese aircraft during this attack.

The G4M excellently showed itself at the initial stage of the Second World War. They bombed the territories of China and the Philippines, Port Moresby in New Guinea and Darwin in Australia. On December 10, 1941, near the coast of Malaysia, torpedoes of an G4M aircraft destroyed the British battleship Prince of Wales and the battlecruiser Repulse.

In January 1942, 17 bombers (including GM4) took off from the Japanese military base in Rabaul and attempted to attack the US aircraft carrier Lexington. However, the American “Wildcat” fighters destroyed 15 of the Japanese bombers.

Japanese Bomber Wrecked on Munda Airdrome.

In the future, because of weak armor, G4M bombers became increasingly easy prey. They received the unofficial nickname “One-time lighter” or “Flying cigar“. During the war, the G4M was produced only at Mitsubishi plants, and 2,414 in all.

After the surrender of Japan, almost all Japanese aircraft were destroyed. The only surviving plane is a G4M1 located in the Museum of Aviation in Santa Monica, USA.

Guadalcanal-Tulagi Operation, 7-9 August 1942 Largely intact floating wreckage of a Japanese Navy Type 1 land attack plane (a type later code named “Betty”), which crashed during the aerial torpedo attack on the Allied invasion

Japanese Navy Type 1 land attack planes (Mitsubishi G4M1 “Betty”) fly low through anti-aircraft gunfire during a torpedo attack on U.S. Navy ships maneuvering between Guadalcanal and Tulagi in the morning of 8 August 1942. Note that these planes are being flown without bomb-bay doors.

A burning Japanese Mitsubishi G4M (Allied code Betty) bomber buring during an attack by US planes, probably in the southwest Pacific, ca. 1943-1945.

Mid- or late-production G4M1 Model 11s with the propeller spinners and rubber ply beneath the wing fuel tanks.

Mistsubishi G4M1 (“Betty”) bomber wreck in Truk Lagoon, Micronesia.

Mitsubishi G4M “Betty” bomber on Ie Shima, August 19, 1945, having carried a Japanese surrender delegation to the island. Note white paint with green cross insignia.

Mitsubishi G4M “Betty” in United States Army Air Forces markings as war booty.

Mitsubishi G4M-49 (US code name- Betty)

Mitsubishi G4M and G6M with Tokyo delegation 1945

Mitsubishi G4M2 model 24 763-12 fitted with Type 3 Ku-6 anti-ship radar

Mitsubishi G6M on the island of Ie Shima 19 August 1945

Mitsubishi G4M2 captured at Clark Field 2

G4M Betty bombers assembly line 1945

Mitsubishi G4M2e of 711 Hikotai, 721 Kokutai “Jinrai” coded 721-328 is carrying an Ohka bomb. Kanoya 1945

Mitsubishi G4M2 model 22 FI-II of ATAIU-SEA

Mitsubishi G4M2 Otsu

Brand new G4M2 model 24

P1Y Ginga and Mitsubishi G4M Betty at Yokosuka naval base August 1945

Mitsubishi G4M bomber coded 762-K-15

G4M and G6M Betty Ie Shima August 19, 1945

Parachute bombs are dropping from low-flying American planes on revetments protecting dispersed G4M bombers on the runway at Vunakanau Airfield, Rabaul, New Britain

G4M1 coded Z2-313 of 751 Kokutai in flight, 1943

G4M bomber leaving smoke trails


Production

The Type 97 medium tank was manufactured by Mitsubishi Heavy Industries (1,224 units) and Hitachi Industries (355 units),[citation needed] as well as some limited production in the Army's Sagami Arsenal. A total of 2,123 vehicles was constructed from 1938 to 1943, of which 1,162 units were the standard Type 97 and 930 units were the improved Type 97-kai version. The remainder were various specialized variants produced in small numbers. The number of Type 97 medium tanks produced was slightly lower than of the Type 95 Ha-Go light tanks, but larger than any other tank fielded by Empire of Japan. Total production of the 57 mm & 47 mm gun Type 97 medium tanks was 2,092. Although production peaked in 1943 it was the last year any Type 97 was produced, as factories switched to the new tank designs, most notably the Type 1 Chi-He.


The Chinese front and Burma, 1941–42

Japan’s entry into war against the western Allies had its repercussions in China. Chiang Kai-shek’s government on December 9, 1941, formally declared war not only against Japan (a formality long overdue) but also, with political rather than military intent, against Germany and Italy. Three Chinese armies were rushed to the Burmese frontier, since the Burma Road was the only land route whereby the western Allies could send supplies to the Nationalist Chinese government. On January 3, 1942, Chiang was recognized as supreme Allied commander for the China theatre of war and a U.S. general, Joseph W. Stilwell, was sent to him to be his chief of staff. In the first eight weeks after Pearl Harbor, however, the major achievement of the Chinese was the definitive repulse, on January 15, 1942, of a long-sustained Japanese drive against Ch’ang-sha, on the Canton–Han-k’ou railway.

Thereafter, Chiang and Stilwell were largely preoccupied by efforts to check the Japanese advance into Burma. By mid-March 1942 two Chinese armies, under Stilwell’s command, had crossed the Burmese frontier but before the end of the month the Chinese force defending Toungoo, in central Burma between Rangoon and Mandalay, was nearly annihilated by the more soldierly Japanese. British and Indian units in Burma fared scarcely better, being driven into retreat by the enemy’s numerical superiority both in the air and on the ground. On April 29 the Japanese took Lashio, the Burma Road’s southern terminus, thus cutting the supply line to China and turning the Allies’ northern flank. Under continued pressure, the British and Indian forces in the following month fell back through Kalewa to Imphāl (across the Indian border), while most of the Chinese retreated across the Salween River into China. By the end of 1942 all of Burma was in Japanese hands, China was effectively isolated (except by air), and India was exposed to the danger of a Japanese invasion through Burma.


13 thoughts on &ldquo #11 The Radios: The Sherman Tank Had Some Of The Most Advanced Radios In The World At The Time &rdquo

I have recently had a dozen or so of the interphone control boxes turn up in some of my dad’s old collection there still wrapped in the brown paper with hardware bag intact I believe bc-606*are there a call for these anywhere on the market .

The BC603 reciever was very well made, I had two not realising they were used in the Sherman’s…this was 1980, and as a radio ham, i picked up a couple and converted them to receive UHF by adding a UHF tv tuner, and using the BC603 as the 2nd if and output. They had a resistor added across the tuning circuit which from memory would have been a 33k 1/4 watt, this widened the receive bandwidth. This must have been done to compensate for other radios transmitting slightly off the intended frequencies. The RX frequency being fully adjustable would be tuned in to their own transmit frequency then hopefully everyone else was on the same page…if you are restoring a set, and using more modern transmitters, then removing this resistor if fitted, will tighten up the receive selectivity and reduce adjacent frequency interference..and improuve audio. Shame I didn’t keep one. The manual i had with one of them gave some amusing info on how to destroy the receiver and not let it fall into enemy hands . Not an easy task as they were very robust, and could be dried out and made to work again if they were dropped in a pond or river..

Colin,
Great post. I even mostly understood it! The Sherman manuals have a section with various options on destroying the whole tank, or just the really important stuff like the gun and radios. I’m not sure how often the crews actually did this stuff, I can only think of a select few photos of crew destroyed Shermans. Granted, once we were winning, most of the time the knocked out allied tanks were in Allied territory in NWE.

Hi, just wanted to let you know that the “unidentified” microphone shown in the second photo of the intercom equipment is a T-45 (“lip”) Microphone. In that photo it is shown with the HS-30 Headset (under the M1 steel helmet) and the Chest Set TD-4 plugged into the Interphone Control Box BC-606.

This equipment represents the late-war / final versions of the individual taker interphone headset and mic. Both the HS-30 and T-45 were designed to be able to be used with the M1 helmet and were also “universal” items that could also be used in infantry radio setups.

If you closely at late war photos of US tankers, you can often spot the T-45 “lip mic” and the HS-30 Headset can often be identified by the spring clip and big, in-line C-410 Transformer (necessary to match the impedance output of the BC-603 Radio Receiver – part of the SCR-508). The HS-30 was fielded a few months earlier than the T-45, and I’ve identified at least one in use during pre-invasion training in England.

The first photo shows the M1938 Tank Helmet with the HS-18 Headset installed (the R-14 receivers are fitted into the side flaps of the helmet with the cord secured to the rear) . The microphone is the T-30 Microphone (i.e. “throat mic”). The T-30 is connected to the SW-141 Switch (i.e. “push-to-talk switch”) which is suspended from the neck by the leather neck strap. The HS-18 Headset is connected CD-307 Cord. Both the SW-141 and the CD-307 are then connected to the interphone control box from an early RC-61 Interphone set. This represents the pre-war / early war setup that continued in use until the end of the war.

Tank commanders often substituted the T-17 (handheld) Microphone for the T-30 (or later T-45) Microphone. The T-17 cord was long enough to reach the interphone control box without the use of the CD-307 Cord.

BTW, for giggles and grins, the Commonwealth setups shown are both Canadian (although they are also No. 19 intercom setups). The helmet on the left is a unique Canadian tank helmet that was only ever used in training in Canada and England. During combat, Canadian tankers often wore the US M1938 Tank Helmet modified with the receivers for the No. 19 set instead of the HS-18. Usually, though, they simply wore their black beret (as shown on the right). The headset on the right has a cotton webbing suspension that would allow it to be worn under the Commonwealth steel tank helmet.

Anyways, all three photos are from my collection. You’re welcome to continue to use them, but I thought you might like to know the technical details. The mystery T-45 Microphone saw considerable use in the last couple of months of the war, and it’s a fun exercise to try to identify them in photos.

Thank you for this effort It was amazing to read Great work and honest too.


5 replies on &ldquoKingdom of Thailand (WW2)&rdquo

Is there much information about the Vickers-Crossley 6×4 armoured cars available ?

there is some out there but its a little spotty, and I haven’t been able to find anything on the exported vehicles outside of the Japanese purchases

Rip my country we have an only light tank I think the only tank that can fight is Type 76 and some of the tank from Japanese :C

On What Year Base Are These Tanks Numbered? I Know Japanese Tanks Were Type’d On The Japanese Imperial Year, But On What Calender Are Thai Vehicles Based?

Budhist years. For instance the Type 83 is named after the Budhist year of 2483 (1940)


2006: Graf Zeppelin

The German navy built only one aircraft carrier for WW2. She was launched in 1938 and by May 1941 Grand Admiral Raeder informed Hitler that the Graf Zeppelin, being 85 percent complete at that time, would finally be finished the following year. In reality, by 1943 a 95% complete Graf Zeppelin was abandoned due to lack of interest in the project from Hitler.

When World War Two ended in 1945, on April 25 to be exact, the aircraft carrier was scuttled in the shallow waters of Stettin in Poland. This step was done to make sure that Graf Zeppelin would not end up in Russia’s hands.

However, the Russians refloated her on March of 1946 and she was towed from Poland to Leningrad with the intention to repair her. When this didn’t happen and after some time, the German aircraft carrier was towed back to the Polish coast.

1947 saw the Graf Zeppelin becoming a practice target for Soviet warplanes and Naval ships. 24 bombs and projectiles later, she was still afloat. Eventually, two torpedoes finished her off and sent her down her watery grave.

For many years, nobody knew the actual sinking position of the aircraft carrier. It wasn’t until almost six decades later – in 2006 – that her wreckage was discovered underwater by Petrobaltic.

The Polish Oil Company ship found a wreck just close to the port of Leba which was about 265 meters in length. Further investigations by the the Polish Navy survey ship ORP Arctowski on July 27 that same year confirmed the find — it was, indeed, the Graf Zeppelin. She was sitting 264 feet below the water surface.