Old Dominion ID-3025 - History

Old Dominion ID-3025 - History


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Old Dominion
A former name retained.
(ID-3025: t. 1,802; 1. 266'10"; b. 42'6"; dr. 18'6"; cpl. 6)

Old Dominion (ID-3025), launched as a steamer by Harlan and Hollingsworth, Wilmington, Del., in 1872, was acquired by the Navy from the Luckenback S.S. Co., New York City, 18 October 1917, and placed in service as a non-selfpropelled barge, 8 August 1918. An iron hulled vessel, Old Dominion was used as a coastwise collier until transferred to the 5th Naval District, 17 April 1919, for inactivation. She was sold to the Neptune Line, New York City, 2 October 1919.


Founded in 1934 Old Dominion Freight Line started out as a single truck running a 94-mile route in Virginia, over the last 80+ years we&rsquove led the way to become a national LTL (less-than-truckload) freight leader and global transportation company.

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    Company-Histories.com

    Address:
    500 Old Dominion Way
    Thomasville, North Carolina 27360
    U.S.A.

    Statistics:

    Public Company
    Incorporated: 1950
    Employees: 6,895
    Sales: $556.5 million (2002)
    Stock Exchanges: NASDAQ
    Ticker Symbol: ODFL
    NAIC: 484122 General Freight Trucking, Long Distance, Less Than Truckload 484121 General Freight Trucking, Long Distance, Truckload 481112 Scheduled Freight Air Transportation


    Company Perspectives:
    Mission: To provide innovative services that satisfy customer needs and result in a reasonable profit that ensures growth and success of our union free employees, company and shareholders. We will maintain a formal and continuous Quality Management process to achieve our mission. Vision: To be the premier transportation company in selected regional, interregional and intrastate markets served.


    Key Dates:
    1934: Old Dominion is founded by Earl and Lillian Congdon.
    1950: Earl Congdon dies and Lillian becomes president.
    1962: The company expands with the purchase of a High Point, North Carolina-based furniture mover Earl Congdon, Jr., becomes president.
    1969: New acquisitions expand Old Dominion's reach into the Northeast and the South.
    1980: The Motor Carrier Act allows the company to add service to far-flung markets.
    1991: An IPO follows two years of double-digit revenue growth.
    1995: Acquisition provides entry into markets in the Southwest.
    1998: The density of service infrastructure improves in the Southeast through acquisition and expansion David Congdon is named COO.
    1999: Old Dominion initiates international less-than-truckload (LTL) service into Mexico.
    2002: Old Dominion initiates Air Express Service.

    Old Dominion Freight Line, Inc. provides less-than-load trucking (LTL) services for general commodities, such as textiles and consumer goods, and serves more than 20,000 points across North America. The company operates more than 115 local, regional, and interregional service centers in 38 states, where partial shipments are consolidated for forward transportation or are re-sorted for local distribution. Old Dominion provides full-state coverage in 24 states from New Hampshire west to Illinois and south to Florida, and including Texas and Oklahoma. Special services include Speed Service, for expedited next-day and second-day shipments, and Air Express, for airfreight forwarding. Through partnerships in Mexico and Canada, the international division provides freight transportation to several locations in those countries. Container drayage service is offered through port facilities on the Atlantic Ocean in Virginia, North and South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida on the Gulf of Mexico at New Orleans and on the Pacific Ocean at Long Beach, California.

    Founding the Company in Virginia, the Old Dominion State

    As the name suggests, Old Dominion Freight Line originated in the state of Virginia. Earl and Lillian Congdon founded the company in Richmond in 1934 and, with one truck, Earl transported general commodities between and around Norfolk and Newport News. After Congress regulated the trucking industry in 1935, Old Dominion received approval from the Interstate Commerce Commission to continue operating along that route, allowing the company to expand its fleet and driving staff.

    During World War II, activities at military bases in Norfolk and Newport News increased freight traffic and Old Dominion accessed this new business for trucking service. After the war, however, traffic declined. The Teamsters Union, which had organized the truck drivers and warehouse workers during the war, led a strike at Old Dominion. The Congdons decided to close business operations, but opened 11 weeks later with nonunion labor.

    Earl Congdon died in 1950, leaving Lillian and sons Earl, Jr., and Jack to manage Old Dominion Freight Line. Lillian's first action as president was to incorporate the company.

    Old Dominion expanded in the late 1950s and early 1960s, adding new routes outside the state of Virginia for the first time. The acquisition of Bottoms-Fiske Truck Line, a furniture mover based in High Point, North Carolina, expanded company operations to southern Virginia and throughout North Carolina. In 1962 Old Dominion relocated to High Point to be near major furniture and textile manufacturers, but the company retained its Virginia name. Earl took the helm as president at this time, and Lillian became chairwoman.

    The company continued to expand during the late 1960s and 1970s, initiating drayage service on the Atlantic coast and entering new markets through acquisition. Old Dominion acquired Barnes Truck Line, Nilson Motor Express, and White Transport in 1969, and Star Transport in 1972, extending operations to markets in the Northeast and the South. With the acquisition of New Jersey-based Deaton Trucking in 1979, Old Dominion entered the market for full-load and flat-bed trucking.

    Industry Deregulation Sparking Challenges and Changes During the 1980s

    Federal reform of trucking industry regulations through the Motor Carrier Act of 1980 prompted many changes at Old Dominion. The legislation allowed Old Dominion to add service, without regulatory approval, to points in Florida, Tennessee, and California, as well as to Dallas and Chicago. Specialization in LTL freight transportation provided an opportunity to provide trucking services to more markets. Rather than shipping directly to the customer, LTL service was based on a network of terminals where freight was sorted for local distribution. Industry deregulation allowed the company to develop rapidly for flexible commodities transportation, opening service centers where freight could be resorted en route to its final destination, combining different shipments more readily for greater efficiency. Old Dominion began to build service centers for geographic concentration, opening 27 centers during the early 1980s.

    Deregulation created an extremely competitive environment in the trucking industry and Old Dominion targeted customers of unionized carriers, which could not provide the flexible service of a nonunion carrier because unions limited workers to specific jobs. For instance, the new flexible scheduling of transportation services meant that a shipment could arrive at any time without a union, anyone could handle receiving a shipment regardless of their job description if a regular worker was not available. Old Dominion workers frequently voted against unionization the company attributed much of its success to employing nonunion workers.

    The competitive atmosphere prompted the formation of many new freight transport companies that offered discount rates, frequently undercutting the rates of other carriers. In response to this difficult business environment, the Congdons hired John Ebeling, a veteran of the trucking industry, as president and chief operating officer, the first person outside the family to hold such a high-level position at Old Dominion. Ebeling was instrumental in forming quality management programs and computerizing operations for cost efficiency and improved service.

    The competitive atmosphere of the 1980s, along with investment in infrastructure, led to financial losses in 1986 and 1987. Through capital investment and service improvement programs Old Dominion became profitable and entered a period of steady growth and expansion. In 1990 the company reported sales of $134.8 million, representing a 17 percent increase over 1989, and net profit of $4.7 million. A fleet of 673 tractors and 2,461 trailers transported shipments through 47 service centers in 20 states, though primarily in eight southeastern states. With greater emphasis on developing LTL services, Old Dominion discontinued its furniture shipment division and sold the general commodities truckload and flatbed freight division of its Deaton subsidiary in 1991.

    1991 Public Offering of Stock Marking Decade of Expansion

    Despite a recession and a decade of industry volatility, Old Dominion successfully launched an initial public offering of stock in late 1991. Selling its stock at $12.50 per share, the company grossed $15.6 million and the proceeds were applied to debt repayment and a strategy of aggressive geographic expansion. Old Dominion expanded services by increasing the density of service centers in existing markets as well by entering new markets. This was accomplished through acquisition, expansion of existing facilities, and new facility development. In 1993 the company launched new intra-regional service in the mid-Atlantic states.

    In September 1995, Old Dominion acquired certain assets of Denver-based Navajo LTL, Inc., including 82 tractors, 264 trailers, and ten service centers. Six of the service centers provided Old Dominion entry into new markets, in Kansas City, Phoenix, Albuquerque, Denver, Salt Lake City, and Sacramento, while service centers in San Francisco, Los Angeles, Dallas, and Chicago were integrated into existing operations. Old Dominion purchased or opened six additional service centers, entering new markets in Minnesota, Wisconsin, Missouri, and Indiana.

    By the end of 1995 the company operated a total of 67 service centers in 35 states and Washington, D.C. The availability of service culminated in a 17 percent increase in LTL tonnage transported in 1996 and an overall 12 percent increase in tonnage transported as full-load or LTL service. Revenues in 1996 reached $293 million, yielding a net profit of $6.1 million.

    Although the company expanded into new territory, most expansion activity emphasized building a dense service network in the Southeast. The January 1998 acquisition of assets from Fredrickson Motor Express, based in Charlotte, involved 26 terminals in North and South Carolina, Virginia, and Georgia, though 19 terminals overlapped with Old Dominion facilities. In August Old Dominion purchased assets from Goggin Truck Line of Shelbyville, Tennessee, serving metropolitan and rural areas in the Southeast. The two acquisitions resulted in the addition of nine new service centers in 1998, while another four service centers opened in upstate New York, extending new service to that area. Old Dominion invested an unprecedented $48.7 million in tractors, trailers, and service centers in 1998, compared with an average of $30 million in the late 1990s.

    Expansion continued in 1999 with the January acquisition of Skyline Transportation. Assets included 23 terminals in North and South Carolina, Georgia, Tennessee, and Alabama, with only one overlap with Old Dominion facilities. The acquisition provided Old Dominion an opportunity to improve next-day service to and from the Midwest.

    Other service expansion involved new facilities in Delaware, West Virginia, and Pennsylvania, as well as the relocation and consolidation of facilities. A new $9 million facility in Rialto, California, combined and expanded operations in southern California. In November Old Dominion acquired a service center in Dallas from Nation's Way Transport Service for $3.65 million in a bankruptcy auction. Old Dominion's nearby location accommodated 63 doors, while the new facility would accommodate 164 doors within five years. Old Dominion planned to develop the terminal as a hub for Texas, Louisiana, Oklahoma, Arkansas, and New Mexico. A small service center was opened in Laredo, Texas, for introduction of transportation service into Mexico.

    From 2000: New Markets, New Services, New Technologies

    While Old Dominion continued to pursue geographic expansion in the early 2000s, the company sought internal growth through the implementation of new services and improvements to existing services. One dimension of this concern for service involved providing full-state coverage within existing territories. In the first half of 2000, Old Dominion extended full-state service to 21 states east of the Mississippi River. This service infrastructure allowed the company to introduce the Speed Service Program, providing customized, time-sensitive delivery service.

    An opportunity to improve its service network in Texas and Oklahoma came in February 2001 with the acquisition of Carter & Sons Freightways, Inc. of Carrollton, Texas. In addition to trucking and office equipment, the acquisition involved 23 service centers, which provided Old Dominion with complete service coverage of Texas and Oklahoma and complementary service to Old Dominion terminals in Louisiana, Arkansas, and New Mexico. The company merged ten service centers into existing facilities, so the acquisition provided a total of 13 new facilities. The acquisition provided infrastructure to offer next-day and second-day service in the five-state area and contributed approximately $23 million in revenue.

    Old Dominion introduced two new services in 2002, OD Air Express and OD Parts Assembly and Distribution. OD Air Express, an air cargo transportation service, provided nightly schedules of service through 51 airport locations. Old Dominion hired eight regional sale managers to promote air service through airfreight brokers, forwarders, and airlines and opened a centralized facility for air transport arrangements. Assembly and Distribution elaborated on existing service that assembled a customer's product at any Old Dominion service center and loaded it on any company's equipment for transport to a final destination. The company also received shipments from a customer's vendors or another carrier for forward distribution anywhere in the Old Dominion system.

    Old Dominion supported its program of service improvements with the implementation of several new technologies. Ether wireless service for handheld devices provided mobile data synchronization, proof of delivery, real time pick-up and delivery status, and other information. Fleetwise brand dispatch and route planning software packages facilitated communication between drivers and dispatchers and determined the best delivery routes for new service orders as they were received. The Dock Yard Management System provided the status of a shipment anywhere in the Old Dominion service network using Radio Frequency Identification tags that automatically record shipment arrivals and departure. Old Dominion upgraded its web site with a new look, increased speed, and ease of navigation for customer convenience in tracing shipment status.

    Lower demand for transportation services due to a weak economy in 2001 did not stop Old Dominion from continuing its strategy of expansion. Instead, the company sought to offset low demand with cost and service improvements. The company reduced transit time in more than 3,000 of 13,000 service lanes, while the transit time of coast-to-coast service was reduced by one day. Service improvements put Old Dominion in a competitively advantageous situation, attracting accolades from Wall Street, which more than doubled the company's stock value in 2002.

    In 2003 Old Dominion continued to expand and upgrade its service center facilities. The company added a 22-door facility in Baton Rouge and relocated a Shreveport service center to a larger, more central location in Monroe. In May Old Dominion opened a 38-door service center in Des Moines, greatly furthering potential business opportunities in Iowa and the Midwest. In June the company announced plans to open a facility in the Reno area.

    Principal Operating Units: OD Domestic OD Expedited OD Technology OD Global.

    Principal Competitors: Arkansas Best Corporation Con-Way Transportation Services Roadway Corporation USF Corporation Yellow Corporation.

    • Allen, Margaret, "Old Dominion to Create South-Central Hub," Dallas Business Journal, November 19, 1999, p. 17.
    • "Carrier on the Move," Transportation & Distribution, June 2002, p. 16.
    • "Delivered Data Cuts Costs," Advanced Transportation Technology News, December 2002, p. 6.
    • "Fleets Online," Fleet Owner, May 1, 2003.
    • Ludorf, Carol, "Old Dominion Freight Line and Portable Data Terminals," Transport Technology Today, November-December 2002, p. 26.
    • Martin, Edward, "The Road Not Taken," Business North Carolina, March 1995, p. 38.
    • Mildenberg, David, "Will Road-Wary Investors Pull into Truck Stocks?," Business North Carolina, January 1992, p. 45.
    • Nicholson, Gilbert, "Big Expansion for Old Dominion," Birmingham Business Journal, March 2, 2001, p. 1.
    • "Old Dominion Freight Line Rolls Out Wireless Solution," Transport Technology Today, August 2002, p. 33.
    • "Old Dominion Increases Rates," JoC Online, July 2, 2002.
    • Schulz, John D., "Adding Capacity," Traffic World, January 25, 1999, p. 26.
    • ------, "What Recession? Old Dominion Freight Line Bucks Trend, Predicts 16.7 Percent Revenue Rise in '03," Traffic World, December 9, 2002, p. 22.
    • "Thomasville, NC-Based Old Dominion Freight Line Sees Revenues Grow," Knight Ridder/Tribune Business News, April 26, 2002.
    • "Thomasville, NC-Based Old Dominion Freight Line Sets Stock Price," Knight Ridder/Tribune Business News, November 6, 2002.

    Source: International Directory of Company Histories , Vol. 57. St. James Press, 2004.


    The degree offers you many varied options to expand your horizons beyond the required number of classroom courses. The department offers study abroad courses over the spring break. A very popular study abroad course is the Holocaust in France. Students travel to Paris and trace the route of French Jews to Auschwitz. There are also possibilities for an entire study abroad semester in universities around the world. Internships in museums, at historical and archaeological sites, and libraries give you hands-on practical experience and offer networking possibilities for later employment.

    A bachelor’s degree in history will give you invaluable research and analytic skills that will prepare you to enter into several professional fields. Teaching at the secondary level of education is a major career field. You can work as a historian in many large government and commercial organizations. You can use your research skills working in archives. You can also work as a curator in a museum. A very important professional field is serving in the military. A degree in history is also great preparation for a career as a lawyer.


    Learn more about Old Dominion's history as an industry-leading domestic and global shipper.

    Read a letter written by President & CEO Greg Gantt.

    See Old Dominion's prestigious awards and accolades received in recent years.

    Learn about Old Dominion's vision to be the premier transportation solutions company in domestic and global markets served.

    Stay current on all of Old Dominion's official announcements.

    Here's where investors and others can view Old Dominion's financial information, including our Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) financial reports.

    Old Dominion's tentative holiday schedule: ODFL reserves the right to adjust this schedule based on business conditions.

    OD Currently operates 247 service centers with approximately 41,000 tractor and trailers.

    Learn more about OD and our relationship as the Official Freight Carrier for Major League Baseball.


    OLD DOMINION HISTORY BOOK CELEBRATES 70 YEARS OF HIGHER EDUCATION IN HAMPTON ROADS

    When city leaders in the late 1920s dreamed of creating an institution of higher education in Hampton Roads, the Old Dominion University of today would have been beyond even their wildest imagination. But, the carefully orchestrated plan of those leaders, such as Robert Hughes, A.H. Foreman and former Norfolk Mayor S. Heth Tyler, provided the foundation for one of the region's most precious gems.

    The story of Old Dominion's emergence from a single schoolhouse that was a branch of the College of William and Mary to a 200-acre campus with several off-site and distance learning locations is detailed in the university's new history book, "Old Dominion University: From the Great Depression to the New Millennium, 1930-2000," which was unveiled at Old Dominion's Founders' Day Dinner last night.

    The 230-page text features a stunning array of photos from the university archives, as well as timelines that provide a short trip back in time. The four-color hardback book includes the following 10 chapters.

    1. Royal Mon (an)-archy! The Break from William and Mary
    Covering the development of the school from the dreams of a few Norfolk citizens to the creation of the Norfolk Division of the College of William and Mary, this chapter concludes with the gaining of independent status and finally, becoming a university.

    2. The Tumultuous '60s & '70s - You Say You Want a Revolution?
    This chapter focuses on the 1960s and 1970s, particularly the protests of those decades, with heavy emphasis on such groups as the Students for a Democratic Society. The 1980s also are touched on through coverage of the response to the Iranian hostage crisis.

    3. How Does Your Campus Grow?
    The physical evolution of the campus, from the humble beginnings at the Old Larchmont School to the 21st century stylings of the Gornto TELETECHNET Center, is profiled in the third chapter. Off-campus centers and the planned University Village also are mentioned.

    4. Team Spirit! Old Dominion and the Hampton Roads Community
    The University's many partnerships with such entities as the military and local neighborhoods are highlighted here. The university's enterprise centers and the role Old Dominion plays in Hampton Roads' economy are emphasized. The school's status as an "urban university" is referenced frequently.

    5. Somewhere Over the Rainbow - Embracing the Spectrum of Full Diversity
    This chapter takes the school from the days of segregation to its current status as a "world-class" university with a significant minority and international population. Many firsts are included, such as the first African-American student and first female administrator, and the decade-long discussion of a possible merger between Old Dominion and Norfolk State also is detailed.

    6. The Revolution of Distance Learning
    Old Dominion was a pioneer in distance education. In fact, the school first embraced televised education back in the 1950s. Today, the university's TELETECHNET program makes education possible for students around the commonwealth and beyond who otherwise would likely be unable to pursue a degree (without a significant commute.) The innovative Ships to Sea program also is noted.

    7. The Life & Times of a Monarch
    This chapter on student life covers everything from the Greek system to Superdance to clubs within individual disciplines. Using a timeline approach, the chapter provides a snapshot of what life was like for students each decade. Special emphasis is given to providing a look at national and international events that influenced the times.

    8. Monarch Mania! Athletic Success Comes A-Court-in'
    From the first sports event (a loss in a football game) to national championships and a strong reputation, athletics has played a significant role in Old Dominion's storied history. Certainly, the triumphs of the school's high-profile basketball programs and national championship field hockey and sailing programs are detailed, but significant attention also is given to the lesser-known efforts of Old Dominion's wrestlers, golfers and tennis players, to name a few.

    9. Cultured Pearls: Old Dominion Brings the Finer Things to Hampton Roads
    Theatre, music, dance, visual art - you name the field of endeavor and Old Dominion is there, shaping the cultural landscape of Hampton Roads. This chapter celebrates the university's emergence as an artistic leader in the community.

    10. High Profile: The Names & Faces of Those Who Shaped Old Dominion
    This chapter recognizes the many leaders who molded the school into the University of the 21st Century. The lists of names of those who have served in leadership positions or been recognized with honors tell only part of the story. Each list is accompanied by a short biography of one individual who exemplifies the Old Dominion story. In addition, each president and first lady is profiled.

    The brainchild of Old Dominion President James V. Koch and Vice President for Institutional Advancment John R. Broderick, the publication was produced in-house with freelance writers and artists hired as needed.

    "The university's history was 70 years in the making, but the last three years have been particularly busy for those who worked on the actual publication," said Broderick. "I'm proud of the work they have done to create a truly first-class look at the institution through the eyes of those who have helped it grow."

    Local writer Maggie Brydges served as the primary author, and Elizabeth V. Harders of Old Dominion's Office of University Relations was the book's managing editor. Julie Hale, a 2000 graduate of Old Dominion's master of fine arts in creative writing program, not only conducted the majority of research for the book, but also wrote the chapter on culture. Former Daily Press sportswriter Bob Moskowitz handled the chapter on Old Dominion's storied athletic program. Keith Lanpher was hired to photograph the campus of today. University photographer Chuck Thomas also contributed photographically, as did Danny Holcomb and L. Todd Spencer. Karen Smallets of the Office of University Publications designed the book, which was printed by Liskey & Sons Printing Inc. in Norfolk.

    Others who assisted with the project include: Victoria Burke, director of University Publications copy editors Beth Cooper and Steve Daniel research assistant Jay Gaidmore and G. William Whitehurst, Kaufman Lecturer in public affairs at Old Dominion.

    "Old Dominion University: From the Great Depression to the New Millennium, 1930-2000" retails for $29.95 and will be available in the campus bookstore and at all local Barnes & Noble stores by the end of October.


    Doc Shelton’s Old Dominion Lures: “Old Fashion Wooden Plugs with a New Design”

    Today we have a special treat. A few weeks ago on the Field & Stream Vintage Tackle Contest, I wrote up an entry on the Old Dominion Lures tackle company. Mike Woody wrote in and shared a lot of information on the firm's history, which he has kindly consented to share on the blog. Thanks, Mike! I've always wanted to know the story behind these lures. Please note also Mike will be selling some custom versions of these lures as a fund raiser to help out cancer victims. We'll keep you posted on these!

    Doc Shelton’s Old Dominion Lures:
    “Old Fashion Wooden Plugs with a New Design”

    I came upon the knowledge of the Old Dominion Lures (ODL) through my father L.G. Woody a member of the National Fishing Lure Collectors Club (NFLCC) at this time, Dad was buying all the old tackle and wooden lures he could find and afford. he was running ads in many out of town papers within 100 miles from his home. Dad received a call one day from a Mrs. Shelton about the ad, she informed him that her husband “Doc” had owned the ODL Co. and gone on to the happy fishing grounds, in her words it seems Doc had many sayings like this. Doc had left her with a few thousand of lures, boxes, blanks, hooks, hair, etc. and she wanted to sell everything.

    Dad made an appointment and drove to her home. She showed him the line of lures her husband had marketed under the ODL name. There were 6 models available:

    The Sneaky Bird #1 (the most popular), Sneaky Bird#2 , Big Mama , Little Mama, Mr. Whiskers #1, Mr. Whiskers #2 .All were top water lures


    Bass Masters advertisement March 1980
    The lures were advertised some during the '70s and '80s like the one shown, cost was $8
    for one lure and a discounted pricing scale for multiple lures. Mrs. Shelton gave my Dad this advertisement.

    Mrs. Shelton offered a tour of her home pointing out several pictures of Bass that “Doc” had caught with his ODL’s. Mrs. Shelton offering info on “Doc” disclosed that he had at one time owned a hotel and an automobile dealership. She also offered the real story behind the Sneaky Bird #1 while on Vacation in Europe he discovered a whistle and the first words out of Doc's mouth were “That would make a good fishing lure.” So Doc struck a deal with the company and had a couple thousand shipped to his home, no two of these whistles are exactly alike but are similar. From the #1 came Doc idea for the sneaky bird #2. Doc made prototypes of lures by hand that he thought would be interesting and catch fish. I have most of the prototypes Dad sold a few to interested collectors at NFLCC conventions and events like that.


    Doc settled on the 6 previously mentioned models, he hired a sawmill in Buckingham, Va.
    to cut the blanks for his lures (not the whistles). He had his employees paint his lures using automotive spray paint, one of the extras for owning a car dealership.

    Mrs. Shelton offered everything at a price my dad could not tie up in them at the time, so he bought two of each model (12 lures) and told Mrs. Shelton if she ever changed her mind and could take less to please contact him. She later called him and told him to drive his truck down that she would sell him everything and clean out her basement, including Doc’s business cards, stationary, and ODL envelopes.

    I now have what is left of ODL, including prototypes, blanks, etc. I have listed several on ebay to share with collectors and fishermen. Dad sold and traded most these and now they’re scattered from coast to coast with experts in Texas, Mississippi and parts unknown who claim to know the background of ODL company, always referring to “DOC” in their claims. Stories about the rare colors, and so on. Doc only sold lures painted in the automobile paint. My Dad had a few custom painted by someone he met from the NFLCC at a convention but the cost was too much to do modern patterns and he gave up on the new look for ODL.


    Special Paint Schemes done after acquiring ODL from the Shelton’s
    I have seen some nice displays of them, they are attractable, fishable, collectable wooden lures. My dad has caught fish on them, especially the Little Mama. My Dad’s comments on the sneaky bird #1: “if the fish don’t bite, blow the whistle on it and knock the fish in the head with a paddle when they jump in the boat.” Seems he had a lot of fun with that line.

    As for the modern times and my plans with these lures, I used to be a collector for many years, I loved collecting crazy crawlers, I got remarried about 20 years ago and sold my collection. Now I have a collection of ODL prototypes that I plan on framing and displaying in my home or office. As for the remaining lures, I have very few blank boxes left and when they’re gone that’s all of it. Last year my daughter was 3 months pregnant when diagnosed with breast cancer, all seems to be going well now with her heath and my grandson born last fall . She is finishing up radiation treatment, we also had another family member diagnosed and almost lost to colon cancer during the same period. My Family has become involved with Relay for Life and I am looking into marketing some of the ODL blanks in Pink, or with ribbons and making donations for the sale of each lure, I’ll keep you posted on where I am with that, I’m hoping to have some available by mid -April.

    I hope what I have provided has shed some light on the Old Dominion Lure Company, If you or anyone has any information on David R. “Doc” Shelton before the ODL years please let me know as I would love to document the man behind the company.


    This course examines the historiography of the Long Civil Rights Movement, the struggle for civil rights stretching from the nineteenth century to the present day and encompassing multiple movements that sought to achieve the basic rights of citizenship for a number of different groups.

    This course examines the complex history of the Holocaust, beginning with the rise of anti-Semitism in the 1930s. It will explore issues of resistance and collaboration as well as ambivalence. It will also examine aspects of postwar Holocaust denial and the memory of the Holocaust as well as its representation in the historiography to the present.


    HIST - History

    The course offers students a critical approach to interpreting World history. A fast-paced survey of World history from 1500 to the present, it focuses on the major intellectual, religious, social, cultural, political, environmental and scientific developments that have influenced the course of World history. It looks at cross-cultural relations in the form of economic exchange, technology transfer, war and conquest, and international organizations.

    HIST𧅥H . Interpreting the Asian Past . 3 Credits .

    The course is a fast-paced survey of Asian civilization in a global context from the emergence of Indian and Chinese civilizations to the events unfolding today. It follows the courses of political, social, cultural, religious, and economic development in East, South, and Southease Asia.

    HIST𧅦H . Interpreting the European Past . 3 Credits .

    The course is a fast-paced survey of European civilization. It focuses on the major intellectual, religious, social, cultural, political, environmental, and scientific developments that have influenced the course of European history.

    HIST𧅧H . Interpreting the Latin America Past . 3 Credits .

    This fast-paced survey covers the last 600 years in the political, social, economic, and cultural histories of Latin America. Special attention will be paid to the global context of this multi-ethnic and multi-lingual region.

    HIST𧅨H . Interpreting the American Past . 3 Credits .

    This course offers students a critical approach to interpreting the history of the United States. A fast-paced survey of American history from the era of colonization to the present, it focuses on the major intellectual, religious, social, cultural, political, environmental, and scientific developments that have influenced the development of the United States.

    HIST𧅩H . Interpreting the African Past . 3 Credits .

    This course offers students a critical approach to interpreting the history of Africa. A fast-paced survey of African history, it affords students a grounding in the major themes of African history. The course focuses on the major economic, social, and political institutions of Africa, past and present, and explores how historical developments assist comprehension of present-day Africa.

    HIST𧅾H . Honors: Interpreting the American Past . 3 Credits .

    The course is open only to students in the Honors College. Special honors section of HIST𧅨H.

    HIST𧅿H . Honors: Interpreting the European Past . 3 Credits .

    The course is open only to students in the Honors College. Special honors section of HIST𧅦H.

    HIST𧇉 . Introduction to Historical Methods . 3 Credits .

    Required of all history and secondary education social studies majors. Recommended prior to upper-division course work. Examines methods of historical research and primary and secondary source analysis, inclusive of internet usage. Explores historiography and historical writing. Introduces students to issues in the philosophy of history. Prerequisites: HIST𧅤H or HIST𧅥H or HIST𧅦H or HIST𧅧H or HIST𧅨H or HIST𧅩H.

    HIST𧈮 . Perspectives in Teaching World History to 1500 . 3 Credits .

    The course gives students a critical perspective on world civilizations from prehistory to 1500. It focuses on the major cultural, intellectual, scientific, geographic/environmental and religious developments of the world. The course emphasizes the critical assessment of primary documents and artifacts and the utilization of that material in the classroom. Prerequisites: HIST𧅤H or HIST𧅥H or HIST𧅦H or HIST𧅧H or HIST𧅨H or HIST𧅩H or HIST𧅾H or HIST𧅿H.

    HIST𧈰T . History of Medicine, Disease, and Health Technology . 3 Credits .

    Examines the history of medicine and epidemiology from ancient times through the twenty-first century. The course takes a comparative look at medical practices in Europe and around the globe and focuses heavily on the complex relationship between human societies and disease. The development of medical technologies and their impact are examined. Prerequisites: HIST𧅤H or HIST𧅥H or HIST𧅦H or HIST𧅧H or HIST𧅨H or HIST𧅩H or HIST𧅾H or HIST𧅿H.

    HIST𧈱 . Heroes and Hoplites: Ancient Greece . 3 Credits .

    This course will explore the history and material culture of the ancient Greek world, from the Bronze Age Minoans to the death of Alexander the Great. Key ideas will include hoplite warfare, Greek religion, the conflict with Persia, the development of Athenian democracy and Sparta’s mixed constitution, and the eventual conflict between these two city-states. Prerequisite: HIST𧅤H or HIST𧅥H or HIST𧅦H or HIST𧅧H or HIST𧅨H or HIST𧅩H or HIST𧅾H or HIST𧅿H.

    HIST𧈵 . The Crusades . 3 Credits .

    This course examines the series of conflicts between Western Europe and the Middle East from the 11th to the 14th century. It investigates the motives, process and outcomes of the invasion of the Middle East by European armies. It also addresses how this phenomenon has been understood in the past. Prerequisite: HIST𧅤H, HIST𧅥H, HIST𧅦H, HIST𧅧H, HIST𧅨H, HIST𧅩H, HIST𧅾H, or HIST𧅿H.

    HIST𧈶 . Renaissance Europe . 3 Credits .

    This is an examination of the Renaissance in both Italy and Northern Europe from the 14th to the 16th centuries emphasizing the new learning, humanism and the place of the individual as well as the political and artistic new achievements of the age. Prerequisites: HIST𧅤H or HIST𧅥H or HIST𧅦H or HIST𧅧H or HIST𧅨H or HIST𧅩H or HIST𧅾H or HIST𧅿H.

    HIST𧈷 . Early Modern Europe . 3 Credits .

    The course covers the period between the late Middle Ages and the beginning of the modern era, roughly 1350-1715, exploring the Renaissance, the Reformation, and the Age of Exploration. There is emphasis on the culture of the period as contemporaries coped with depression, plague, religious change, and cultural encounters outside Europe. Prerequisites: HIST𧅤H or HIST𧅥H or HIST𧅦H or HIST𧅧H or HIST𧅨H or HIST𧅩H or HIST𧅾H or HIST𧅿H.

    HIST𧈸 . The Rise of Rome: The Roman Republic . 3 Credits .

    The course explores the history and material culture of the Roman Republic from its foundation in the sixth century BCE through the civil wars of the first century BCE. This class will emphasize the political institutions of the Republic and its conquests throughout the Mediterranean world. It will also study the social and religious institutions that influenced Rome. Prerequisite: HIST𧅤H, HIST𧅥H, HIST𧅦H, HIST𧅧H, HIST𧅨H, HIST𧅩H, HIST𧅾H or HIST𧅿H.

    HIST𧈹 . Bread and Circuses: The Roman Empire . 3 Credits .

    This course explores the history and material culture of the Roman Empire as it emerged from the ashes of the Roman Republic, through its transformation in later antiquity under the Christian emperors. It studies the emperor's ability to maintain peace and explores the ways in which religion, family, and entertainment shaped the daily life of the empire's inhabitants. Prerequisite: HIST𧅤H, HIST𧅥H, HIST𧅦H, HIST𧅧H, HIST𧅨H, HIST𧅩H, HIST𧅾H or HIST𧅿H.

    HIST𧈻 . Into the Arena: Christians in the Ancient World . 3 Credits .

    How did Christians go from being a tiny sect to the religion of the Roman Empire? Why did some Romans persecute Christians? Could someone be both a Jew and a Christian at the same time? This class explores the history and material culture of early Christianity from its origins in Jewish Palestine to its ascendancy as an imperial religion. Prerequisite: HIST𧅤H, HIST𧅥H, HIST𧅦H, HIST𧅧H, HIST𧅨H, HIST𧅩H, HIST𧅾H or HIST𧅿H.

    HIST𧈼 . Cold War in History . 3 Credits .

    The course explores changes in the international system which arose in the wake of World War II and focuses on conflict and cooperation in selected regions of the developed and developing world. Prerequisites: HIST𧅤H or HIST𧅥H or HIST𧅦H or HIST𧅧H or HIST𧅨H or HIST𧅩H.

    HIST𧉂 . Ancient and Medieval England . 3 Credits .

    This course explores the social and political history of early England, with an emphasis on the fall of the Romans, the Anglo-Saxon and Norman invasions, medieval social and cultural life, the evolution of feudal relationships, and the development of the English monarchy. Prerequisites: HIST𧅤H or HIST𧅥H or HIST𧅦H or HIST𧅧H or HIST𧅨H or HIST𧅩H.

    HIST𧉃 . Britain and the World . 3 Credits .

    This course explores the development of Britain in the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries. Key themes include the evolution of English democracy, the rise and decline of the British empire, Britain's role in international affairs, and England's tenuous relationship with Ireland, Scotland, and Wales. Prerequisites: HIST𧅤H or HIST𧅥H or HIST𧅦H or HIST𧅧H or HIST𧅨H or HIST𧅩H.

    HIST𧉄 . Europe in the Twentieth Century . 3 Credits .

    This course explores the evolution and development of European states, institutions and cultures over the course of the twentieth century. Relations among European states--large and small--and their peoples are examined. Prerequisites: HIST𧅤H or HIST𧅥H or HIST𧅦H or HIST𧅧H or HIST𧅨H or HIST𧅩H (HIST𧅦H recommended).

    HIST𧉅 . Rise and Fall of Empires . 3 Credits .

    This course examines the expansion of European empires from the 15th through the 20th century. It explores the dynamics of imperialism and colonialism, including ideologies of conquest, trade and commerce, labor and slavery, cultural encounters, and racism and exploitation. It concludes with a review of decolonization and its consequences for our world. Prerequisite: HIST𧅤H, HIST𧅥H, HIST𧅦H, HIST𧅧H, HIST𧅨H, HIST𧅩H, HIST𧅾H, or HIST𧅿H.

    HIST𧉇 . Russia: Culture and Civilization . 3 Credits .

    The course is a survey of Russian history from the ninth to the end of the nineteenth century stressing the distinctiveness of Russian culture and institutions, the influence of the West, the multi-national character of the Empire, and the decline of the old regime. Prerequisites: HIST𧅤H or HIST𧅥H or HIST𧅦H or HIST𧅧H or HIST𧅨H or HIST𧅩H.

    HIST𧉈 . Russia from Stalin to Putin . 3 Credits .

    The course is a survey of the formation and development of the USSR from the fall of the Russian monarchy and the revolutions of 1917 to the emergence of the Russian Federation after 1991. Prerequisite: HIST𧅤H or HIST𧅥H or HIST𧅦H or HIST𧅧H or HIST𧅨H or HIST𧅩H or HIST𧅾H or HIST𧅿H.

    HIST𧉐 . The Emergence of New China . 3 Credits .

    The course is the history of China covering late Imperial China, the impact of Western imperialism, the Republican Period, and the establishment of the People's Republic. Prerequisites: HIST𧅤H or HIST𧅥H or HIST𧅦H or HIST𧅧H or HIST𧅨H or HIST𧅩H or HIST𧅾H or HIST𧅿H.

    HIST𧉒 . Japan's Era of Transformation . 3 Credits .

    This is the history of Japan since 1800. It covers the decline of the Tokugawa Shogunate, modern nation building in the Meiji period, domestic conflicts and war in the twentieth century, and the roots of Japan's economic prominence today. Prerequisites: HIST𧅤H or HIST𧅥H or HIST𧅦H or HIST𧅧H or HIST𧅨H or HIST𧅩H or HIST𧅾H or HIST𧅿H.

    HIST𧉙 . Native American History . 3 Credits .

    The course examines the history and culture of Native American peoples from early contact with Europeans to present day. There is particular focus on ways that cultural interactions affected and transformed native peoples - their beliefs, societies, and political structures. Prerequisites: HIST𧅤H or HIST𧅥H or HIST𧅦H or HIST𧅧H or HIST𧅨H or HIST𧅩H.

    HIST𧉚 . Colonial and Revolutionary America . 3 Credits .

    The course examines social, cultural, economic and political developments in North America from 1492 to the ratification of the Constitution of 1787. Course explores the role of class, gender, and race in the creation of an American culture. Prerequisites: HIST𧅤H or HIST𧅥H or HIST𧅦H or HIST𧅧H or HIST𧅨H or HIST𧅩H or HIST𧅾H or HIST𧅿H.

    HIST𧉜 . The Early Republic, 1787-1850 . 3 Credits .

    The course explores America's transformation from a republic to a democracy by examining the political, economic, social and intellectual history of the United States' first half century. Prerequisites: HIST𧅤H or HIST𧅥H or HIST𧅦H or HIST𧅧H or HIST𧅨H or HIST𧅩H or HIST𧅾H or HIST𧅿H.

    HIST𧉝 . American Naval History . 3 Credits .

    This course examines American naval history and American naval theory from the colonial period to the present day. It analyzes the importance of American naval conflicts, developments in naval technology, and the social and political changes that shaped the U.S. Navy. Prerequisites: HIST𧅤H or HIST𧅥H or HIST𧅦H or HIST𧅧H or HIST𧅨H or HIST𧅩H or HIST𧅾H or HIST𧅿H.

    HIST𧉞 . History of the Old South . 3 Credits .

    The course is a study of the Old South civilization from the colonial era to the Civil War, with particular emphasis on the frontier, slavery, the cotton kingdom, and southern cultural contributions. Prerequisites: HIST𧅤H or HIST𧅥H or HIST𧅦H or HIST𧅧H or HIST𧅨H or HIST𧅩H or HIST𧅾H or HIST𧅿H.

    HIST𧉟 . The Civil War and Reconstruction . 3 Credits .

    The course is a study of the origins of the idea of secession and of the war, of the military, political, and economic contest between the Confederate and Federal governments, and finally of the long-range effects of the war as revealed in the failure of Reconstruction. Prerequisites: HIST𧅤H or HIST𧅥H or HIST𧅦H or HIST𧅧H or HIST𧅨H or HIST𧅩H or HIST𧅾H or HIST𧅿H.

    HIST𧉠 . The Immigrant Experience in U.S. History . 3 Credits .

    This class examines the history of U.S. immigration during the 19th and 20th centuries. The course strives to complicate the 'Melting Pot' metaphor in U.S. history by exploring the transnational quality of immigrants' lives, the way class, race, gender, and nationality have shaped the immigrant experience, and the role nation-states have played in managing immigration. Prerequisite: HIST𧅤H, HIST𧅥H, HIST𧅦H, HIST𧅧H, HIST𧅨H, HIST𧅩H, HIST𧅾H or HIST𧅿H.

    HIST𧉡 . Robber Barons, Reformers, and Radicals: The US Gilded Age and Progressive Era . 3 Credits .

    This course covers the Gilded Age and Progressive Era of U.S. history (1870s-1920s), a dynamic period characterized by industrialization, imperialism, international and internal migration, World War I, and a variety of social and political movements. This course explores these and other topics from an international perspective to consider how global processes influenced the U.S., and how the U.S. influenced the rest of the world in the late 19th and early 20th century. Prerequisite: HIST𧅤H or HIST𧅥H or HIST𧅦H or HIST𧅧H or HIST𧅨H or HIST𧅩H or HIST𧅾H or HIST𧅿H.

    HIST𧉢 . From the Jazz Age to the Atomic Age: US, 1920-1945 . 3 Credits .

    The course covers the domestic and international history of the U.S. during the Roaring Twenties, The Great Depression, World War II. Prerequisites: HIST𧅤H or HIST𧅥H or HIST𧅦H or HIST𧅧H or HIST𧅨H or HIST𧅩H or HIST𧅾H or HIST𧅿H.

    HIST𧉣 . The United States, 1945-1991 . 3 Credits .

    The course is the history of the United States from the end of World War II to the end of the Cold War. The course focuses on domestic politics, social change, economic developments and international relations. Prerequisites: HIST𧅤H or HIST𧅥H or HIST𧅦H or HIST𧅧H or HIST𧅨H or HIST𧅩H or HIST𧅾H or HIST𧅿H.

    HIST𧉤 . Virginia History . 3 Credits .

    The course is an examination of Virginia's past from Jamestown to the present. The course emphasizes the colonial experience, Virginia's role in the new nation, the post-Civil War era and Virginia in the twentieth century. Prerequisites: HIST𧅤H or HIST𧅥H or HIST𧅦H or HIST𧅧H or HIST𧅨H or HIST𧅩H or HIST𧅾H or HIST𧅿H.

    HIST𧉥 . The United States in the 1960s . 3 Credits .

    The course examines the political, social and cultural revolutions which occurred in the United States from 1960 to 1974. Topics include the reforms of JFK and LBJ the rise of conservatism the impact of the baby boom generation the civil rights, anti-war, and women's movements the war in Indochina and Watergate and the fall of Richard Nixon. Prerequisites: HIST𧅤H or HIST𧅥H or HIST𧅦H or HIST𧅧H or HIST𧅨H or HIST𧅩H or HIST𧅾H or HIST𧅿H.

    HIST𧉦 . The U.S. in the Second World War . 3 Credits .

    The course is designed to familiarize students with important concepts in the history of America's involvement in the Second World War. It surveys the significant events, personalities, and changes that occurred between 1941 and 1945, heavily focusing on America's three 'fronts': the European, the Pacific and the home front. Prerequisite: HIST𧅤H, HIST𧅥H, HIST𧅦H, HIST𧅧H, HIST𧅨H, HIST𧅩H, HIST𧅾H or HIST𧅿H.

    HIST𧉧 . American Maritime History . 3 Credits .

    The course explores the various maritime influences in American history. Topics discussed include ocean exploration, navies and maritime conflicts, shipping and shipbuilding, marine resource extraction, rivers and canal transportation, maritime migration, water use, and other issues in maritime history from exploration to the present. Prerequisites: HIST𧅤H or HIST𧅥H or HIST𧅦H or HIST𧅧H or HIST𧅨H or HIST𧅩H or HIST𧅾H or HIST𧅿H.

    HIST𧉨 . American Military History . 3 Credits .

    The course is a study of American military policy, 1763 to the present, in relation to its political, economic, and social implications. Prerequisites: HIST𧅤H or HIST𧅥H or HIST𧅦H or HIST𧅧H or HIST𧅨H or HIST𧅩H or HIST𧅾H or HIST𧅿H.

    HIST𧉩 . African-American History to 1865 . 3 Credits .

    The course examines African-American history from the African background through the Civil War. Emphasis is placed on an analysis of African-Americans' role in the political, economic, social and cultural life of the United States. Prerequisites: HIST𧅤H or HIST𧅥H or HIST𧅦H or HIST𧅧H or HIST𧅨H or HIST𧅩H or HIST𧅾H or HIST𧅿H.

    HIST𧉪 . African-American History Since 1865 . 3 Credits .

    This course examines African-American history from Reconstruction to the present. Emphasis is placed on the analysis of African-Americans' role in the political, economic, social and cultural life of the United States. Prerequisites: HIST𧅤H or HIST𧅥H or HIST𧅦H or HIST𧅧H or HIST𧅨H or HIST𧅩H or HIST𧅾H or HIST𧅿H.

    HIST𧉫 . Women in U.S. History . 3 Credits .

    The course examines the experiences of women in U.S. history from 1607 to the present, paying particular attention to influences of race, class, ethnicity and changing conceptions of gender. Prerequisites: HIST𧅤H or HIST𧅥H or HIST𧅦H or HIST𧅧H or HIST𧅨H or HIST𧅩H or HIST𧅾H or HIST𧅿H.

    HIST𧉭 . Reform in U.S. History . 3 Credits .

    This course explores the role of reform in shaping American history from the colonial era to the late 20th century. Topics addressed include rebellion as reform, the eras of reform, reform in modern America, and the role of conformity versus individualism. Prerequisite: HIST𧅤H, HIST𧅥H, HIST𧅦H, HIST𧅧H, HIST𧅨H, HIST HIST𧅩H, HIST𧅾H or HIST𧅿H.

    HIST𧉰 . Internship . 3 Credits .

    The content varies according to the internship. Qualifies as a CAP experience. Prerequisites: Permission of the department and one or more Interpreting the Past courses.

    HIST𧉱 . Practicum . 3 Credits .

    The content varies according to practicum. Prerequisites: Permission of the department and one or more Interpreting the Past courses.

    HIST𧉲 . Africa and the Atlantic Slave Trade . 3 Credits .

    This course examines political, commercial and cultural developments in Africa from 1400 to 1900 in the context of the Atlantic slave trade. It provides students a basic understanding of the historical slave trade, including the roles of Europeans, Americans and Africans within the trade, the slave trade's impact on African economies and societies, and the making of an African Diaspora. Prerequisites: HIST𧅤H or HIST𧅥H or HIST𧅦H or HIST𧅧H or HIST𧅨H or HIST𧅩H or HIST𧅾H or HIST𧅿H.

    HIST𧉳 . Modern Mexico . 3 Credits .

    This survey of Mexico's history since independence highlights the social, cultural and economic changes that accompanied four turning points in the political history of Mexico: the independence movement, the wars of the reform, the Revolution of 1910, and the trend toward democratization that began in the 1980s. Attention will be paid to the changing scope of Mexico's relations with the United States, and to comparisons of Mexico's experience with that of other Latin American countries. Prerequisites: HIST𧅤H or HIST𧅥H or HIST𧅦H or HIST𧅧H or HIST𧅨H or HIST𧅩H or HIST𧅾H or HIST𧅿H.

    HIST𧉴 . Central America and the Caribbean Since 1800 . 3 Credits .

    This course surveys socio-economic and political change after about 1800 in the Caribbean Basin (Central America and the insular Caribbean), a region whose diverse colonial, ethnic, labor and migratory experiences will provide rich opportunities for comparative study. Plantation slavery and its legacies, independence movements, export-led economic growth, nationalism, social movements, revolution and great-power rivalries will be the major themes. Prerequisites: HIST𧅤H or HIST𧅥H or HIST𧅦H or HIST𧅧H or HIST𧅨H or HIST𧅩H or HIST𧅾H or HIST𧅿H.

    HIST𧉵 . U.S.-Latin American Relations . 3 Credits .

    This survey of Latin America's relations with the United States since the early nineteenth century will seek to identify and account for changing patterns in what has been a highly asymmetrical power relationship. The emphasis will be on the outcomes of U.S. policy in the region, combining the study of broad trends (especially in economic and security policy since the 1890s) with a close analysis of three cases: Mexico, Cuba and Central America. The influence of the larger international environment on those relations will be considered. Prerequisites: HIST𧅤H or HIST𧅥H or HIST𧅦H or HIST𧅧H or HIST𧅨H or HIST𧅩H or HIST𧅾H or HIST𧅿H.

    HIST𧉶 . Spain in America: The Rise of the Hispanic World . 3 Credits .

    Beginning with Spain's leading role in European expansion in the 15th and 16th centuries, this course explores the formation of the 300-year Spanish empire in America, the impact in both America and Europe of its encounter with native Americans, and the myriad colonial-era institutions that would shape the future of the Hispanic world. Prerequisite: HIST𧅤H, HIST𧅥H, HIST𧅦H, HIST𧅧H, HIST𧅨H, HIST𧅩H, HIST𧅾H or HIST𧅿H.

    HIST𧉽 . Africa in the 20th Century . 3 Credits .

    This course surveys the political, social and cultural history of colonial and post-independent Africa. Major themes include colonization and resistance, anti-colonial movements, social and cultural transformations, urbanization and popular culture and post colonial challenges. Prerequisites: HIST𧅤H, HIST𧅥H, HIST𧅦H, HIST𧅧H, HIST𧅨H, HIST𧅩H, HIST𧅾H or HIST𧅿H.

    HIST𧉾 . African Civilizations . 3 Credits .

    This course explores the history of African states, societies, and cultures from the earliest civilizations to the nineteenth century. Major themes include: trade, technology and state formation, power and authority in ancient and medieval Africa, women and gender, religious transformations, including the spread of Christianity and Islam, and cross-cultural encounters. Prerequisites: HIST𧅤H, HIST𧅥H, HIST𧅦H, HIST𧅧H, HIST𧅨H, HIST𧅩H, HIST𧅾H or HIST𧅿H.

    HIST𧊂T . The Evolution of Modern Science . 3 Credits .

    The course traces the development of modern science from the ancient Greeks to the 21st Century. Prerequisites: HIST𧅤H or HIST𧅥H or HIST𧅦H or HIST𧅧H or HIST𧅨H or HIST𧅩H or HIST𧅾H or HIST𧅿H.

    HIST𧊄T . Discovering Earth's History . 3 Credits .

    Geology and paleontology as technological systems during the industrial revolution of the nineteenth century, including global & local exploration, competing interpretations of empirical data, and the discovery that the earth itself had a history whose sources were inscribed in the very ground on which they walked. Readings include Darwin, Lyell, Humboldt, and others. Prerequisites: HIST𧅤H, HIST𧅥H, HIST𧅦H, HIST𧅧H, HIST𧅨H, or HIST𧅩H.

    HIST𧊅T . Technology and Civilization . 3 Credits .

    This course examines the role of technology and relevant science. Students examine the interaction between society and technology and investigate why technology is both a reflection of, and a shaping influence upon, "modern" culture and beyond. Prerequisites: Three hours of history.

    HIST𧊇 . Paris/Auschwitz Study Abroad . 3 Credits .

    This course explores the history of the Holocaust in France and Poland by taking students to key sites tied to the Holocaust in Europe. Students visit Paris and explore the history of pre-war Jewry and sites of deportation. Students travel to Poland and juxtapose the French and Polish experience and denial of the Holocaust. Public history in the museum setting is explored. Prerequisite: HIST𧅤H, HIST𧅥H, HIST𧅦H, HIST𧅧H, HIST𧅨H, HIST𧅩H, HIST𧅾H or HIST𧅿H.

    HIST𧊈 . The Holocaust and Vichy France . 3 Credits .

    This course surveys French history during World War II, focusing on the fall of France, the German occupation, and the establishment of the Vichy collaborationist government. It explores the fate of French and foreign-born Jews under Vichy, deportation and resistance, and the issues of post-war memory and denial. Prerequisites: HIST𧅤H, HIST𧅥H, HIST𧅦H, HIST𧅧H, HIST𧅨H, HIST𧅩H, HIST𧅾H or HIST𧅿H.

    HIST𧊉 . Studies in Jewish History . 3 Credits .

    This course examines specific topics, eras, and themes of Jewish history. Specific titles will be listed in the on-line course schedule. Prerequisites: HIST𧅤H or HIST𧅥H or HIST𧅦H or HIST𧅧H or HIST𧅨H or HIST𧅩H or HIST𧅾H or HIST𧅿H.

    HIST𧊌 . Topics in History . 1-3 Credits .

    The course is a study of selected topics. These courses are open to both majors and nonmajors. History majors may take these courses to satisfy history concentration requirements. These courses will appear in the course schedule, and will be more fully described in information distributed to academic advisors. Prerequisites: HIST𧅤H or HIST𧅥H or HIST𧅦H or HIST𧅧H or HIST𧅨H or HIST𧅩H or HIST𧅾H or HIST𧅿H.

    HIST𧊒W . Senior Seminar in History . 3 Credits .

    The course is an advanced study of selected topics leading to production of a research paper. It is required of all history and secondary education social studies majors. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisites: HIST𧇉 and a grade of C or better in ENGL𧇓C or ENGL𧇝C or ENGL𧇧C.

    HIST𧊘 . War and American Society in the Twentieth Century . 3 Credits .

    The course is an exploration of the content and meaning of wartime experiences within American society between 1898 and 1975. Emphasis is on comparing the levels of national, institutional and personal experiences of war as they affected people at home and in battle, and on considering the relationships between warmaking and social development at particular times. Prerequisites: HIST𧅤H or HIST𧅥H or HIST𧅦H or HIST𧅧H or HIST𧅨H or HIST𧅩H or HIST𧅾H or HIST𧅿H.

    HIST𧊙 . History of US-Mexico Borderlands . 3 Credits .

    The course examines the history of the region straddling the U.S. - Mexico border from the Spanish Conquest to the present day, focusing on issues of immigration, economic and political integration and the complicated nature of state-building in a transnational environment. Prerequisites: HIST𧅤H or HIST𧅥H or HIST𧅦H or HIST𧅧H or HIST𧅨H or HIST𧅩H or HIST𧅾H or HIST𧅿H.

    HIST𧊞 . Freedom, Rights and Revolution: Evolution of the State System 1648-1815 . 3 Credits .

    The course examines the social, cultural, political, legal and diplomatic history of Old Regime Europe, the rise of the territorial state, and challenges to its authority. In addition to events and sources contemporary to that age, students will be introduced to the most important interpretive theories that have emerged in the past generation on the Continent as well as in Britain and America. Prerequisites: HIST𧅤H or HIST𧅥H or HIST𧅦H or HIST𧅧H or HIST𧅨H or HIST𧅩H or HIST𧅾H or HIST𧅿H.

    HIST𧊟 . Empire, Nations, and Industrialization: Evolution of the State System, 1815-1914 . 3 Credits .

    The course focuses on the evolution of international politics, diplomacy, and social, cultural and economic structures in the development of empires, nations and industrialization in the evolution of the modern state system from 1815 to 1914. Explores the relationship among European powers and their relations with smaller states in Europe and spheres of influence throughout the world. Prerequisites: HIST𧅤H or HIST𧅥H or HIST𧅦H or HIST𧅧H or HIST𧅨H or HIST𧅩H or HIST𧅾H or HIST𧅿H.

    HIST𧊠 . States, Territories and International Organization: Evolution of the State System Since 1914 . 3 Credits .

    The course focuses on the evolution of international politics, diplomacy and social, cultural and economic structures in states territories, and international organizations since 1914. Emphasis on shifting European alingments since 1914, the two World Wars, the development of the bi-polar world and the development and evolution of international organizations. Prerequisites: HIST𧅤H or HIST𧅥H or HIST𧅦H or HIST𧅧H or HIST𧅨H or HIST𧅩H or HIST𧅾H or HIST𧅿H.

    HIST𧊡 . World War I: The Great World War on All Fronts . 3 Credits .

    This course will examine "The Great War" from its origins in the late nineteenth century to the Paris Peace Conference and from a variety of perspectives from battlefields and trenches to the home-front. It will also consider the impact of the war on society and its relevance to the contemporary world. Prerequisites: HIST𧅤H, HIST𧅥H, HIST𧅦H, HIST𧅧H, HIST𧅨H or HIST𧅩H.

    HIST𧋂 . American Revolution and Historical Memory . 3 Credits .

    This seminar style course will introduce the principal writings and interpretations of the era of the American Revolution from the mid-eighteenth century to the ratification of the federal constitution of 1787. Besides exploring the relationship between the British Empire and its colonies, the course will look at the role of historical memory in understanding of the past. Prerequisites: HIST𧅤H, HIST𧅥H, HIST𧅦H, HIST𧅧H, HIST𧅨H, HIST𧅩H, HIST𧅾H or HIST𧅿H.

    HIST𧋃 . The Atlantic World and Early America . 3 Credits .

    During the early modern period, global processes of imperial, economic, and demographic expansion drew British North America into transnational networks that spanned the Atlantic Ocean and brought Europeans, Africans, and Americans together. This course will explore the Atlantic World as a place, a process, and a new field of historical inquiry. Prerequisite: HIST𧅤H, HIST𧅥H, HIST𧅦H, HIST𧅧H, HIST𧅨H, HIST𧅩H, HIST𧅾H or HIST𧅿H.

    HIST𧋇 . African-American Historiography . 3 Credits .

    The course is an examination of the ways historians have addressed specific issues in African-American history. Prerequisites: HIST𧅤H or HIST𧅥H or HIST𧅦H or HIST𧅧H or HIST𧅨H or HIST𧅩H or HIST𧅾H or HIST𧅿H.

    HIST𧋈 . Research in Local History . 3 Credits .

    The course explores the history of Hampton Roads through student use of research materials. Prerequisites: HIST𧅤H or HIST𧅥H or HIST𧅦H or HIST𧅧H or HIST𧅨H or HIST𧅩H or HIST𧅾H or HIST𧅿H.

    HIST𧋖 . Struggle for Democracy and Development in Latin America . 3 Credits .

    This course analyzes, from a historical perspective, two core problems in Latin America's modern (since c. 1880) history: political authoritarianism and economic underdevelopment. The temporal and spatial dimensions of change are highlighted in discussions of patron-client political systems, military autonomy and impunity, social movements and revolution, export-oriented economic growth, industrialization, and the roles of national, ethnic and gender identities. Prerequisites: HIST𧅤H or HIST𧅥H or HIST𧅦H or HIST𧅧H or HIST𧅨H or HIST𧅩H or HIST𧅾H or HIST𧅿H.

    HIST𧋗 . Revolution in Latin America . 3 Credits .

    No world region matches Latin America in the frequency or extensive impacts of social revolution and social revolutionary movements from the 19th century to the present. A comparative approach to causation, process and outcome will govern the course, with special attention to the role of violence, ideology, international relations and socioeconomic structure. Prerequisite: HIST𧅤H, HIST𧅥H, HIST𧅦H, HIST𧅧H, HIST𧅨H, HIST𧅩H, HIST𧅾H or HIST𧅿H.

    HIST𧋛 . Global Africa . 3 Credits .

    The course is designed to enrich students' understanding of the political, economic, social and cultural forces that shaped Africa and continue to affect the lives of peoples throughout the continent. It will focus on the contributions of African people, ideas and materials to global history and the impacts of imperialism, decolonization and globalization in Africa. Prerequisites: HIST𧅤H or HIST𧅥H or HIST𧅦H or HIST𧅧H or HIST𧅨H or HIST𧅩H or HIST𧅾H or HIST𧅿H.

    HIST𧋠W . Senior Seminar in International Studies . 3 Credits .

    This writing-intensive course for advanced undergraduates explores the international dimensions of historical problems selected by the instructor. It fulfills the Senior Seminar requirement for International Studies majors, who are expected to have senior standing. Prerequisites: A grade or C or better in ENGL𧇓C or ENGL𧇝C or ENGL𧇧C, senior standing in the BAIS degree program or permission of the instructor and the director of the BAIS program.

    HIST𧋡 . Museums and Museology . 3 Credits .

    The course examines the history of the public museum. It introduces museology, the profession of museum organization and management, focusing on design, outreach, artifact acquisition and preservation, and international museum standards. Museums as sites of historical research and teaching will receive special attention. Prerequisite: HIST𧅤H, HIST𧅥H, HIST𧅦H, HIST𧅧H, HIST𧅨H, HIST𧅩H, HIST𧅾H or HIST𧅿H.

    HIST𧋢 . Global History of Sport . 3 Credits .

    This course examines imperialism, globalization, cultural diffusion, modernization, and social movements through the aperture of global sport. It pays attention to how sports act as embodiments of cultural performance and enable culture and political influence, as well as resistance, from the ancient Greeks through the twentieth century. Prerequisite: HIST𧅤H, HIST𧅥H, HIST𧅦H, HIST𧅧H, HIST𧅨H, HIST𧅩H, HIST𧅾H, or HIST𧅿H.

    HIST𧋭 . Holocaust and Film: Representing the Unimaginable in the Visual Turn . 3 Credits .

    The course explores the history of the Holocaust through the medium of film as document, testimony, propaganda, artifact, artistic representation and projection of collective memory. Special attention is given to considering the medium of film from the viewpoint of the historian. Prerequisite: HIST𧅤H, HIST𧅥H, HIST𧅦H, HIST𧅧H, HIST𧅨H, HIST𧅩H, HIST𧅾H or HIST𧅿H.

    HIST 495/595 . Topics in History . 1-3 Credits .

    The course is an advanced study of selected topics designed for small groups of qualified students to work on subjects of mutual interest which may not be offered regularly. These courses appear in the course schedule, and will be more fully described in information distributed to academic advisors. Prerequisites: HIST𧅤H or HIST𧅥H or HIST𧅦H or HIST𧅧H or HIST𧅨H or HIST𧅩H or HIST𧅾H or HIST𧅿H.

    HIST𧋱 . Tutorial Work in Special Topics in History . 3 Credits .

    Independent reading and study on a topic to be selected under the direction of an instructor. Conferences and papers as appropriate. Prerequisites: Senior standing and approval of the department chair.

    HIST 498/598 . Tutorial Work in Special Topics in History . 3 Credits .

    Independent reading and study on a topic to be selected under the direction of an instructor. Conferences and papers as appropriate. Prerequisites: Senior standing and approval of the department chair.

    HIST𧍓 . Topics in History . 1-3 Credits .

    The course is an advanced study of selected topics designed for small groups of qualified students to work on subjects of mutual interest which may not be offered regularly. These courses appear in the course schedule, and will be more fully described in information distributed to academic advisors.

    HIST𧍖 . Tutorial Work in Special Topics in History . 3 Credits .

    Independent reading and study on a topic to be selected under the direction of an instructor. Conferences and papers as appropriate.

    HIST𧍘 . Historical Theory and Practice . 3 Credits .

    Analysis of the development of historical theories, principles and methods and their application to historical research and writing. Required of all graduate students in history.

    HIST𧍚 . Readings in Early American History . 3 Credits .

    This course offers an introduction to the principal writings and interpretations of American history from the period of European colonization of America to the beginning of the American Revolution. Readings and discussions focus on the development of American cultures and identities and on the formation of American social, political, and economic life.

    HIST𧍛 . The American Revolution and Historical Memory . 3 Credits .

    This course introduces the principal interpretations of the American Revolution era from the mid-18th century to the 1787 ratification of the federal constitution. Readings and discussions focus on themes including Britain's relations with the colonies, the independence movement, women, African Americans, Native Americans as well as historical memory of the Revolution.

    HIST𧍟 . A People's Contest: Civil War and Reconstruction . 3 Credits .

    An advanced course designed to familiarize students with the principal historiographical problems besetting the field of studies of the American Civil War and Reconstruction.

    HIST𧍡 . Melting Pot? Readings in Immigration History . 3 Credits .

    This course examines the history of immigration to the U.S., focusing particularly on the late 19th and early 20th centuries. It critiques the "melting pot" metaphor through key themes, including transnationalism the influences of class, race, gender, and nationality working class and race relations formal and informal economies and popular and consumer culture.

    HIST𧍢 . Edible History: Food and Drink in the U.S. and Global History . 3 Credits .

    This course explores the history of food and drink in the U.S. and the world as a way to examine the cultural, social, and political meanings about and consequences of producing and consuming food. This course will explore an array of topics including food as an essential element of identities and power relations, commodity chains, eating trends, and global security.

    HIST𧍣 . The Military in America . 3 Credits .

    This course is designed to familiarize students with the principal historiographical problems besetting the field of U.S. military history from the pre-Revolutionary period to the present day.

    HIST𧍩 . The Long Civil Rights Movement . 3 Credits .

    This course examines the historiography of the Long Civil Rights Movement, the struggle for civil rights stretching from the nineteenth century to the present day and encompassing multiple movements that sought to achieve the basic rights of citizenship for a number of different groups.

    HIST𧍫 . United States Labor and Working Class History . 3 Credits .

    This course provides a historiographical survey of U.S. labor and working class history, focusing on the period after the Civil War. Work as a reflection of everyday life, class formation and class consciousness and the development of unions and other labor organizations are examined through a variety of different methodologies and in the contexts of citizenship and civil rights.

    HIST𧍭 . The Atlantic World and Early America . 3 Credits .

    This course explores the Atlantic World as a place, a process, and a new field of historical inquiry. It examines the global processes of imperial, economic, and demographic expansion that drew British North America into transnational networks that spanned the Atlantic Ocean and brought European, African, and American inhabitants together.

    HIST𧍮 . The Atlantic Slave Trade . 3 Credits .

    The course explores the trans-Atlantic slave trade from its beginnings in the 15th century to its suppression in the 19th century. It examines the historical literature on Africa, the Atlantic slave trade and the New World to provide students with a general orientation to the broad context of the Atlantic slave trade.

    HIST𧍳 . Cuba and Its Revolution . 3 Credits .

    This course examines diverse interpretations of the origins of the 1959 Cuban Revolution led by Fidel Castro, its national and international repercussions, and relevant global contexts. Cuba's colonial status as a sugar plantation society based on African slave labor, the Cuban independence movement, the U.S. war with Spain, U.S.-Cuban relations, and the Cuban Revolution and its Cold War context are considered.

    HIST𧍴 . History of the U.S. Mexico Borderlands . 3 Credits .

    This course examines the historiography of the U.S.-Mexico borderlands. Key themes include the slow, uneven and often unsuccessful integration of the region into centralizing states in Mexico and the United States the changing nature of migration and commerce across the international boundary and the importance of violence and social conflict in shaping the region.

    HIST𧍶 . Democracy and Development in Modern Latin America . 3 Credits .

    From a world-historical perspective and moving from a broad focus on continental change to national contexts, this seminar analyzes two core problems in Latin America's history: political tensions (conceptualized as authoritarianism versus democracy) and economic change (underdevelopment versus development).

    HIST𧍷 . The Rise of the Hispanic World: Spain and Its Empire . 3 Credits .

    The interaction of Spain and its overseas territories is the overarching theme of this seminar, which traces the rise of today's Hispanic world from its emergence in the Iberian peninsula in the 15th century, through the 19th century, when the Spanish Monarchy lost its American and Asian realms. Comparisons with other contemporary world empires will be considered.

    HIST𧍸 . Political Order and Social Change in Mexico Since 1910 . 3 Credits .

    This course traces the roots of current disorder in Mexico by analyzing the 1910 revolution, subsequent authoritarian rule, and the democratization process in the context of social forces that enabled the revolution and then brought it to a close in 2000. Themes include state formation, rule of law, democratization, economic development, U.S.-Mexico relations, and violence.

    HIST𧍻 . Modern British History . 3 Credits .

    This course focuses on the social and cultural history of nineteenth- and twentieth-century Britain. It explores broad themes of social conflict, class divisions, race and racism, and gender dynamics presented in recent historiography . Topics include politics, culture, leisure, entertainment, arts, economy, and the impact of the Empire on Britain.

    HIST𧍼 . The British Empire . 3 Credits .

    This course explores British imperialism and colonialism in the early modern and modern periods, from the Caribbean to Australia with emphasis on the "second British empire" of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Key themes will include: webs of power and communication, labor, gender, race, and colony/metropole relations.

    HIST𧎀 . Studies in East Asian History . 3 Credits .

    HIST𧎁 . Individual & Society in Ancient Greece . 3 Credits .

    This seminar delves into literary and archaeological sources to examine the development of ancient Greece in the archaic, classical and Hellenistic periods. It traces the development of Greece's vibrant culture, the struggles between Athens and Sparta, and the subsequent alliances forced by Phillip II and Alexander the Great.

    HIST𧎂 . Ancient Rome: Text and Artifact . 3 Credits .

    Using historical texts and archaeological remains as sources, this course considers Ancient Rome from the city's mythological foundation stories to its decline in late Antiquity. It will study Roman history and historiography exploring topics including the economy, the military, women's roles, religion, art and architecture in the Republic and the Principate.

    HIST𧎃 . Religion, Culture, and Empire in Greco-Roman Palestine . 3 Credits .

    This seminar focuses on the development of Greco-Roman Palestine, from its encounter with Hellenism to its conquest by Rome, and ultimately to its transformation into the Christian Holy Land under the patronage of Constantine and Helen.

    HIST𧎆 . Studies in Russian History . 3 Credits .

    Research in Soviet archives in the past decade has enriched and enlarged the study of Stalin's era (1924-1953). This reading seminar samples new literature on traditional topics, such as Stalin's rise to power, methods of rule, and foreign policies, as well as scholarship in newly emerging fields. These areas include social history, gender and the family, cinema and popular culture, nationalities, patron-client relations, and the history of science.

    HIST𧎇 . Studies in Maritime History . 3 Credits .

    The seminar explores recent maritime historiography and demonstrates how maritime history presents unique understandings of human history and also works within or redefines broader historical constructs. Students will analyze sources related to specific topics of maritime history.

    HIST𧎈 . France and the Sea . 3 Credits .

    This course examines the complex ways in which the French viewed the Atlantic Ocean and other bodies of water and the opportunities water travel provided them from the sixteenth to the twentieth centuries. Emphasis is placed on the Atlantic as a zone of interaction and on the French global trading networks and the development of overseas empires.

    HIST𧎏 . Early Modern Europe: Religion, Reform, and Violence . 3 Credits .

    This course examines the religious, political and civil strife as well as the ramifications of social change in sixteenth and seventeenth century Europe. Emphasis will be on religiosity and how early modern peoples understood and experienced religious life and how the "reformations" altered gender relations, sexual dynamics, everyday life, and intellectual thought in Western Europe.

    HIST𧎑 . Old Regime and French Revolution . 3 Credits .

    This course introduces students to the interpretive methodologies of questions of "Enlightenment" and the French Revolution that drive much of the historiography in European intellectual history today.

    HIST𧎒 . Studies in European History from 1815-1914 . 3 Credits .

    HIST𧎖 . North Atlantic Resources . 3 Credits .

    This class examines how coastal societies around the North Atlantic have developed their use of fish stocks and other marine resources since the late medieval period and analyzes how and why over-fishing of nearly all major species took place and how international agreements sought to address the issue of sustainable, biological oceanic resources.

    HIST𧎜 . Internships in History . 3 Credits .

    Students work to gain field experience with professionals in such areas as museum management, archives administration, historical editing, historical preservation, electronic records management, archaeology, or oral history. Students are supervised by graduate faculty members who assign academic reading and written work to contextualize and enhance the field experience. Individually arranged. Minimum of 120 hours.

    HIST𧎞 . Fin-De-Siecle Europe . 3 Credits .

    This course examines the intersections of politics and economy with culture and society in Europe from 1880 to 1914 with an emphasis on continental trends. It explores political ideologies relating to nationhood, race, ethnicity, class, and gender and their articulation in the arts, cultural production, technological innovation, and intellectual development at the turn of the century.

    HIST𧎢 . Holocaust History and Memory . 3 Credits .

    This course examines the complex history of the Holocaust, beginning with the rise of anti-Semitism in the 1930s. It will explore issues of resistance and collaboration as well as ambivalence. It will also examine aspects of postwar Holocaust denial and the memory of the Holocaust as well as its representation in the historiography to the present.

    HIST𧎣 . M.A. Exam Preparation and Research . 3 Credits .

    This advanced seminar integrates the skills needed to pass the M.A. exam in history. Exercises include designing examination reading lists, learning the historiography of the exam fields, preparing for orals, and writing and evaluating a practice exam. This course is not open to students pursuing the thesis option. Prerequisite: permission of the graduate program director.

    HIST𧎤 . Examination Preparation Transition . 1 Credit .

    This course prepares students transitioning from the thesis option to the examination option for the comprehensive examinations. Prerequisites: HIST𧎺 and HIST𧎻.

    HIST𧎫 . History of the Global 1960s . 3 Credits .

    Through the work of historians around the world, this course examines the nature of events in the 1960s. It explores global commonalities and local particularities, focusing on the simultaneous and interrelated phenomena of anti-colonial struggle, youth activism, and culture of dissent. It also looks at the countervailing pressures and groups that emerged in opposition.

    HIST𧎷 . Topics in History . 1-3 Credits .

    The course is an advanced study of selected topics designed for small groups of qualified students to work on subjects of mutual interest which may not be offered regularly.

    HIST𧎸 . Tutorial in Maritime History . 3 Credits .

    Individually arranged with appropriate professor and with permission of the graduate program director. Prerequisite: HIST𧎇.

    HIST𧎹 . Tutorials in History . 1-3 Credits .

    Individually arranged with appropriate professor and with the permission of the graduate program director.

    HIST𧎺 . Thesis . 3 Credits .

    HIST𧎻 . Thesis . 3-9 Credits .

    HIST𧏎 . Mao’s China . 3 Credits .

    This reading seminar will focus on the changes of the Chinese society since the beginning of the 20th century. It will examine the pivotal historical events that led to the Chinese revolution, which put Mao's Communist regime in power and has changed Chinese society ever since. While studying the history chronologically, students will identify issues and factors that affect the Chinese political system and society, and examine the legacies of Mao's revolution from social and individual perspectives. The course will also focus on political formation and transformation of the government, social structure and upheavals, economic reforms, and foreign policies. (cross listed with IS𧏎 and IS𧐲).

    HIST𧐛 . Selected Topics in International Studies . 1-3 Credits .

    The advanced historical study of selected topics in international studies.

    HIST𧓦 . Master's Graduate Credit . 1 Credit .

    This course is a pass/fail course for master's students in their final semester. It may be taken to fulfill the registration requirement necessary for graduation. All master's students are required to be registered for at least one graduate credit hour in the semester of their graduation.

    HIST𧓧 . Doctoral Graduate Credit . 1 Credit .

    This course is a pass/fail course doctoral students may take to maintain active status after successfully passing the candidacy examination. All doctoral students are required to be registered for at least one graduate credit hour every semester until their graduation.


    The degree offers you many varied options to expand your horizons beyond the required number of classroom courses. The department offers study abroad courses over the spring break. A very popular study abroad course is the Holocaust in France. Students travel to Paris and trace the route of French Jews to Auschwitz. There are also possibilities for an entire study abroad semester in universities around the world. Internships in museums, at historical and archaeological sites, and libraries give you hands-on practical experience and offer networking possibilities for later employment.

    A bachelor’s degree in history will give you invaluable research and analytic skills that will prepare you to enter into several professional fields. Teaching at the secondary level of education is a major career field. You can work as a historian in many large government and commercial organizations. You can use your research skills working in archives. You can also work as a curator in a museum. A very important professional field is serving in the military. A degree in history is also great preparation for a career as a lawyer.


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