Redwing I AM-48 - History

Redwing I AM-48 - History


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Redwing I

(AM 48: dp. 950; 1. 187'10"; b. 35'6"; dr. 9'9"; s. 14 k.; cpl. 72; a. 2 3", 2 mg.)

The first Redwing (AM-48) was laid down 6 August 1918

Mby the Baltimore DryDock & Shipbuilding Co., Baltimore, d.; launched 7 June 1919; sponsored by Mrs. Fred A. Plagemann, wife of the prospective commanding officer; and commissioned 17 October 1919, Lt. F. A. Plagemann in command.

She operated out of New York City on various training missions until she decommissioned on 14 April 1922. Placed in service early in 1924, she steamed to Norfolk, and was transferred to the Coast Guard on 24 May. Commissioned on 11 October as USCGC Redwing, a cruising eutter, she operated out of New York and Boston until 19 November 1928. In January 1929 she assumed permanent duty out of Astoria Oreg. '

Except for various patrol assignments, Redwing remained at Astoria until 1941. Then returning to the east coast, she was transferred back to the Navy on 29 August, was redesignated ARS-4, and entered Brooklyn Navy Yard for eonversion.

Redwing recommissioned 28 October, Lt. (jg.) Martin C. Sibitsky in oommand. After shakedown, she was assigned to the Atlantic Fleet on 20 November. DeDarting New York the same day, she arrived Argentia, Newfoundland, on 23 November; and from there steamed to Ieeland, arriving 9 December.

Remaining in Ieelandie waters through 9 August 1942, she performed towing and limited salva~e services. She arrived New York 30 August and there engaged in salvage operations until October, when she underwent a short availability at Norfolk.

Redwing departed 6 November for Casablanea, arriving the 25th after a 3-day stopover in Bermuda. She operated under the Casablanca Port Authority as the only salvage shio in the harbor until 5 May 1943. She next reported to Commander, Task Force84, reached Algiers 19 June, towed a damaged merchant ship into port, and departed 27 June for

Bizerte with four YT's in tow. At 0605 29 June, when about 10 miles from her destination, Redwing was rocked by an underwater explosion which tore a large hole in her hull just below the bridge. Five officers and eight enlisted men were blown overboard. She began to list dangerously and the order was given to abandon ship. The four YT's received the crew and recovered two injured officers, two wounded enlisted men, and the body of one other enlisted man.

Her decks awash, Redwing was taken in tow bv the YT's At 1005 near the main channel leading into the harbor at Bizerte, a British destroyer passed close abeam and her wake caused Redwing to roll over. The towing hawsers were eut and she sank in 27 fathoms of water. She was struck from the Navy list 19 August 1943.


USS Redwing (AM-48)

|module= Career Builder: Baltimore Drydock & Shipbuilding Co., Baltimore, MarylandLaid down: 5 August 1918Launched: 7 June 1919Commissioned: 17 October 1919, as Minesweeper No.48Reclassified: AM-48, 17 July 1920
USCGC Redwing, 24 May 1924
ARS-4, 29 August 1941Struck: 19 August 1943Fate: Lost to underwater mine explosion off Bizerte, Tunisia, 29 June 1943 |module2= General characteristics Class & type: Lapwing-class minesweeperDisplacement: 950 long tons (965 t)Length: 187 ft 10 in (57.25 m)Beam: 35 ft 6 in (10.82 m)Draft: 9 ft 9 in (2.97 m)Propulsion: 1 × 1,400 shp (1,000 kW) Harlan and Hollingsworth vertical triple-expansion steam engine, 1 shaftSpeed: 14 knots (26 km/h 16 mph)Complement: 72Armament: 2 × 3 in (76 mm) guns
2 × machine guns >> USS Redwing (AM-48) was an Lapwing-class minesweeper commissioned by the United States Navy for service in World War I. She was responsible for removing mines from harbors, and, in her role as rescue and salvage ship, she was responsible for coming to the aid of stricken vessels. She was laid down 5 August 1918 by the Baltimore Drydock & Shipbuilding Co., Baltimore, Maryland launched 7 June 1919 sponsored by Mrs. Fred A. Plagemann, wife of the prospective commanding officer and commissioned 17 October 1919, Lt. F. A. Plagemann in command.


Red Wing's Brewing History

The state of Minnesota is situated in what has long been known as America’s “Grain Belt,” and the City of Red Wing, located on the Mississippi River, has historically been one of the thriving ports used to ship Minnesota grain to other markets. As one of the historical markers in Red Wing’s Bay Point Park states, “Fertile fields within and beyond Red Wing yielded abundant harvests, supplying grain for grist and flour mills and later for the malting companies and breweries.”

It was natural, then, that brewing would evolve as one of the earliest industries of Red Wing. In fact, by 1867, the city once boasted a total of five breweries: John Hartman’s Hay Creek Brewery (on the west end of Featherstone Road), John Melander’s National Brewery (on the north side of Main Street, east of Jefferson), Lorenz Hoffman’s Steam Brewery (223 Bush Street [the only existing building in Red Wing that once served as a brewery]), Phillip Hoffman’s Brewery (1610-1636 W. Main Street), and William Heising’s City Brewery (405 W. 5th Street). Of these, Phillip Hoffman’s and William Heising’s breweries were the two that went on to take a place of prominence in Red Wing until Prohibition.

Phillip Hoffman pioneered the brewing industry in Red Wing in 1857. When he died in 1868, his widow, Christina, took over operations until she married Jacob Christ, a respected local saloon keeper. The brewery was renamed the “Jacob Christ Red Wing Brewery” in 1872, and a large stone building was erected to accommodate the need for expansion. Jacob passed away in 1890, and Christina sold the business to the new Red Wing Brewing Company in 1893. Eleven years later, in 1904, Zimmermann and Featherston bought the brewery, although the name was changed back to the Red Wing Brewing Co. in 1909 and operated as such until Prohibition in 1919. While the company survived the Prohibition era as the Red Wing Products Co. (producing goods such as non-alcoholic malt beverages, ice, vinegar and cider), outdated equipment led to the brewery’s demise by 1937, and its buildings along what is now Old West Main Street were eventually razed. A small white building and an industrial garage now stand on the site.

While Hoffman’s brewery was the first in Red Wing, William Heising’s brewery held out to be the last. The business began in 1861 in the Old Minnesota House (which became the brewery’s offices and saloon) on the corner of Bush and 5th Streets. A new three-story brewhouse was added in 1869 it was described by the Red Wing Argus newspaper as “a model for permanent structures. Its firm foundation and thick walls ensure its standing for a century.” Heising ran the brewery until his passing in 1873, but his wife, Christina, continued to expand operations (including the building of a new ice house) until she hired Adolph Remmler in 1875 to manage the company.

Christina and Adolph wed in 1877, and Heising’s brewery was changed to Remmler’s Brewery. To compete with the larger St. Paul breweries, Remmler began to bottle and export his beer to markets as far away as Minneapolis and Ellsworth, Wisconsin. Although Adolph Remmler died in 1908, his son, Otto, took over the company. During Prohobition, Remmler’s did not produce any other products, but Otto maintained the facilities until the company’s re-opening in 1934. The investment in new equipment after Prohibition proved to be too much of a financial burden for the company, and the brewery was sold to the Goodhue County Brewing Company in 1948. Even they could not turn a profit, however, and the brewery closed permanently in 1951. In 1955, the site was leveled, and a supermarket was built at the location of the brewhouse.

Today, the parking lot of Koplin’s Supermarket is located where the Old Minnesota House once stood, and an office complex occupies the ground that used to be the icehouse. While the old brewery’s buildings no longer remain, the Red Wing Republican Eagle reported in 1955 that the old catacomb basement of the brewhouse was solid enough to be sealed up and used for the foundation of the supermarket.

(Our logo and label designs are based on the “red wing” and lithography that were used by the original Red Wing breweries.)

Special thanks to author Doug Hoverson and his book, Land of Amber Waters: The History of Brewing in Minnesota, to Bob Kay and his book, US Beer Labels, Vol. 3 – Central States, and to the Goodhue County Historical Society for serving as invaluable resources for the information and images above.


Red Wing, CO Past Weather

This past weather information is provided AS IS and strictly for recreational, educational, and informational purposes only we disclaim liability of any kind whatsoever, including, without limitation, liability for quality, performance, merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose arising out of the use, or inability to use the data. The information may be inaccurate or incomplete based on how well the corresponding weather station successfully or unsuccessfully reported or recorded it with the instruments which measured the weather at the time including gaps between hours or even days. Specifically, LocalConditions.com and this data, as presented, may not and should not be used as a reference for any reason relating to legal proceedings, insurance claims, recovery, loss prevention, making predictions, or critical decisions. Lastly, the weather station may be miles away from the actual area of interest. This data may not be leeched or republished.

Note regarding "Approx. Precipitation / Rain Total"

The "Approx. Precipitation / Rain Total" is calculated in whole based on the last measurement from each hour reported - which is accumulative and reset at the beginning of each hour - ideally. However, some stations reset at the wrong time, such as a few minutes after the hour. We have tried to account for this issue. Most gauges report multiple times per hour. For example, a measurement of precipitation at 8:15am could be 0.04 in. of water - then when a measurement is taken at 8:30am might be 0.06 in. - and at 8:56am might be 0.08 in. So, the accumulative total for that hour would be 0.08 in. - not calculated together to equal 0.18 in. of precipitation. Finally, each hourly total for the day is summed to provide the "Approx. Precipitation / Rain Total" figure.

One other note: if the total is 0, but there was obviously rain - then the instrument is not properly distributing its data from the station. The issue could be temporary or permanent.


Red Wing, MN Past Weather

This past weather information is provided AS IS and strictly for recreational, educational, and informational purposes only we disclaim liability of any kind whatsoever, including, without limitation, liability for quality, performance, merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose arising out of the use, or inability to use the data. The information may be inaccurate or incomplete based on how well the corresponding weather station successfully or unsuccessfully reported or recorded it with the instruments which measured the weather at the time including gaps between hours or even days. Specifically, LocalConditions.com and this data, as presented, may not and should not be used as a reference for any reason relating to legal proceedings, insurance claims, recovery, loss prevention, making predictions, or critical decisions. Lastly, the weather station may be miles away from the actual area of interest. This data may not be leeched or republished.

Note regarding "Approx. Precipitation / Rain Total"

The "Approx. Precipitation / Rain Total" is calculated in whole based on the last measurement from each hour reported - which is accumulative and reset at the beginning of each hour - ideally. However, some stations reset at the wrong time, such as a few minutes after the hour. We have tried to account for this issue. Most gauges report multiple times per hour. For example, a measurement of precipitation at 8:15am could be 0.04 in. of water - then when a measurement is taken at 8:30am might be 0.06 in. - and at 8:56am might be 0.08 in. So, the accumulative total for that hour would be 0.08 in. - not calculated together to equal 0.18 in. of precipitation. Finally, each hourly total for the day is summed to provide the "Approx. Precipitation / Rain Total" figure.

One other note: if the total is 0, but there was obviously rain - then the instrument is not properly distributing its data from the station. The issue could be temporary or permanent.


Hours/Location

3303 North Service Drive
Red Wing, MN 55066
Click here for a map

Lobby Hours
Mon – Fri: 8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.
Sat: 8:30 a.m. – Noon

Drive-Thru Hours
Mon – Fri: 8:30 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Sat: 8:30 a.m. – Noon
*Drive-Up ATM available 24 hours

Phone
651-388-7133
1-888-388-7133 (toll-free)

Touch-Tone Teller
1-877-388-5349 (toll-free)

Holiday Closings

  • New Year’s Day
  • Martin Luther King Day
  • Saturday before Easter (observed)
  • Saturday before Memorial Day (observed)
  • Memorial Day
  • Independence Day (observed on July 3 and July 5 in 2021)
  • Saturday before Labor Day (observed)
  • Labor Day
  • Columbus Day – closing at noon for community service project
  • Veterans Day
  • Thanksgiving Day
  • Christmas Eve
  • Christmas Day

Lost or Stolen Card?

Download the RWCU Card Secure app to freeze/unfreeze your VISA card, or cancel it yourself. You can also check for unauthorized transactions here.

  • If you need our assistance to cancel your RWCU credit card, call 1-855-632-9005.
  • If you need our assistance to cancel your RWCU check card, call 1-800-472-3272 or stop in our office. We can issue a new card along with a different access code on the spot.

8-Inch Boots

8-Inch Classic Moc

At the moment, Red Wing’s 8-Inch Classic Moc is its only offering in the Heritage eight-inch realm, making it a sole survivor whose role is immediately apparent. As the brand’s only eight-inch variant, the Classic Moc is likely Red Wing’s most well-known, harkening back to the golden era of the 1950s, where it was introduced as the quintessential huntsman’s boot. Due to the company’s lineage, the 8-Inch Classic Moc would eventually transition to the job site, followed closely by use for conventional, everyday wear. On its exterior, an iconic Traction Tred rubber outsole, Puritan triple stitch construction, and Goodyear welt provide unparalleled dependability for relentless wear, while a water-resistant, full-grain Oro Legacy Leather, nickel eyelets, and No. 23 last round things out.


When the Looe Sailing Club commissioned Uffa Fox to design the Redwing it was stipulated that she must be a sturdy, able seaboat first and foremost and at the same time fast and fun to sail. At first the boat remained an exclusively West Country class where her qualities in the steep open seas around these coasts were immediately appreciated, but soon her popularity spread to other parts of the coast where similar conditions prevail, until now the latest sail number is 254.

The Redwing is not a “do-it-yourself” type of boat, but one that needs skilful craftsmanship in her construction. She is built to stand up to any amount of rough treatment, and to last for many years. Boats that are now over 70 years old still race regularly at the annual championships and perform admirably. As a consequence, when boats do change hands, which is not often, the second-hand price remains remarkably steady.

However, thanks to the efforts of our boat builders and restorers, over the last couple of decades there are now plenty newer and refurbished boats joining the fleet to complement the older hulls weathered from more half a century of hard racing. The first boats are now nearly 80 years old but with a little bit of TLC even a tired or neglected boat can be given a new lease of life. For example, R19 ‘Gleam’, built in 1947, was found worn-out and abandoned in 1978 and put back in commission for five pounds. Years later and after many changes of ownership she was restored again by Rev Barribal and is now in regular use in the IOS fleet. As far as we know there are two pre-war survivors in seaworthy condition. Number 2 ‘Kittiwake’, having been given a thorough restoration to beautiful condition by Richard Spiller is raced regularly in class events. Number 1, ‘Robin’ (previously Jackdaw) is still in Polruan in Cornwall, in good order and racing regularly, winning the Polruan Regatta K-class this summer.


In the late 1930’s the then Commodore of Looe Sailing Club, Wilfred Neale, approached the well-known designer Uffa Fox with a commission for a sailing dinghy that would be both reasonably cheap to build and seaworthy enough to cope with the rough and tumble of seas off the South Cornwall coast. What Uffa came up with was a fourteen foot long (4.27m) boat of clinker construction, well-stayed rig and with a heavy iron centreplate to provide stability. However, appearances can be deceptive since the “Looe Redwing” as the new boat was called, had a firm turn of bilge, buoyant sections and a flat run that gave her the ability to keep a sea and also plane off wind.

Mr Neale had six boats built at his own expense, in 1939, five of which he gave to members of Looe Sailing Club who otherwise couldn’t afford a boat of their own but wanted to sail, and number 1 he kept for himself.

After the Second World War interest returned to sailing and more boats were built to the Redwing design. The building and class rules were closely monitored by the Class Captain Mr Neale to ensure that each new dinghy was alike – a “one-design”. The Redwing’s popularity grew and spread throughout the West of England, so much so, that in 1947 it was adopted as the principal local one-design racing class and became known as the “West of England Conference Redwing”. 1947 was also the year in which the first Redwing Championship race was held.

By the 1950’s the Redwing’s reputation as a good sea boat had spread and fleets became established all over the West country and Pembrokeshire in West Wales. In 1954 jurisdiction for the class was handed over to the Yacht Racing Association (Now the Royal Yachting Association) and the Redwing became a “National” class.

Over the years there have been a few, mostly minor and sympathetic changes to the rules governing the class. These have generally been to encompass the developments in sailing rigs i.e. the adoption of aluminium alloy spars and synthetic sails. However the hull remains unchanged and new boats are still built exactly as the original plans. Of these changes the most major came in 1966 when it was decided to allow the use of a wooden centreboard in place of the original iron centreplate. This caused a furore at the time but now it is an accepted feature of the boat. Naturally the Redwing became a lot less stable without the benefit of the ballasting effect of 125 pounds of iron and hence a trapeze was tried and adopted in the 1970’s.

Around this time was the low point of the class with competition from dozens of other classes of more modern construction methods. However the enthusiasm of people who have fallen in love with the Redwing as a boat, coupled with the durability of the clinker construction, meaning that 30 and 40 year old boats can still win races, has won through. Since 1988 there has been a resurgence in new Redwings being built both in Cornwall and also North America. Redwing Number 1 now approaching 80 years old is still regularly racing near her birthplace in Cornwall.


From Hell's Kitchen to Hollywood

The younger Tooker followed his father into the print business, eventually opening a new firm, J.H. Tooker Printing Company, at 653 Eleventh Avenue. Using a stone lithography process, his presses produced dazzling graphics for productions from Broadway to Hollywood. (In fact, Tooker helped found Metro Pictures Corporation, a forerunner of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios.) Many of the vibrant and original works created here are collectibles today.

That&rsquos our New York story. What will yours be?

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